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Knife to trim and breakdown large cuts of venison
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Thread: Knife to trim and breakdown large cuts of venison

  1. #1

    Knife to trim and breakdown large cuts of venison

    Long time lurker, first time poster.

    Like most, I come from the world of stainless "high end" German knives. Purchased a Tojiro stainless clad Chinese style cleaver used a few years ago, along with a set of shapton glass/ceramic stones. Been using it almost exclusively, sharpening it with success, and loving it other than for paring and as the title suggests, breaking down meat. I do cut steaks out of whole loins, etc with the cleaver, though it could be a little longer for that task. I'm likely going to stay with the cleaver for veggies of all kinds, but I am tired of having to sharpen my 6" utility Henkel and 8" dexter filet knife every time I take them out, and even then not getting the edge I want.

    So, I'm looking for suggestions on a path forward. I'm really liking the idea of the hiro AS. I need something to use for trimming silverskin and taking apart whole on the bone venison quarters. My wife wants a smallish gyuto or santoku. I'm leaning towards getting a hiro as gyuto that would serve both purposes. My worry is that it's too tall to work around curves etc like a filet knife will, and that it's too long and the wrong shape for cutting apart the different roasts from the quarter. As i type this, I'm wondering why I'm even considering it. I suppose I should just order one as "her" knife and try it out. Comments/suggestions?

    Side note: does hiro still make a suji? Can't seem to find one listed anywhere.

  2. #2
    I use my hankotsu for breaking down venison quarters,silver skin, etc. It works around bone and is stiff enough not to steer too bad. I either use a gyuto, suji or my scimitar for slicing steaks.

  3. #3
    I use a Scimitar and a Petty whenever I am trimming New York strip primals at work, that is probably similar to what you need. I have never worked with venison in that capacity though. Also I recommend giving the wife several options and letting her choose.

  4. #4
    Senior Member WiscoNole's Avatar
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    I would get a 210 suji/petty...you might like the Hiromoto G3 version. A slimmer blade works better for silver skin, IME.
    -Matt

  5. #5
    daveb's Avatar
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    What Mike said.

    To de-bone the leg quarters, I want more torsional strength than I get from a petty, suji or filet knife. For silverskin, thin and sharp with minimal flex works for me. Hankotsu does both well, petty can do both.

    Regards,

    Dave
    Dave
    Older and wider.

  6. #6
    Senior Member DeepCSweede's Avatar
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    That is the reason I picked up a bunch of forgecraft boning and butcher knives. Cost very little and good old school carbon. Old school Dexters work good too.

  7. #7
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    sachem allison's Avatar
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    welcome!
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  8. #8
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    Welcome. I would be picking up the hankotsu, and then something long for slicing.

  9. #9

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    welcome to the forums

  10. #10
    Speaking a professional whole animal butcher who is also a knife enthusiast, and who has tried honkotus, honesukis, and sujis while breaking and trimming all types of animals, I always find myself coming back to forschners and wenger swibo knives. They both hold an edge decently well, and quickly get back to a very sharp edge from a few licks on a steel. I keep the Japanese stuff for home use. If you really want high carbon blades, the next best thing is to grab some nice vintage american made knives on e-bay. Those hold up very well.

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