Quantcast
Fine China Lovers? - Page 3
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 28 of 28

Thread: Fine China Lovers?

  1. #21
    I am bookmarking this thread. Wealth of information. Thanks.


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by scotchef38 View Post
    Fine bone china will also be a finer grade/higher quality than porcelain.
    I disagree with this. The choice to use bone china over porcelain is mainly a choice between English or continental aesthetic and tradition. English use bone because they did traditionally, and Anglophile makers outside England will. Meissen (German) and Limoges (French) use hard paste traditionally and still do so. I don't know that you can make an overall quality statement about bone vs porcelain. They are just slightly different, and have different traditions.

  3. #23
    Senior Member
    mr drinky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    St. Paul, MN
    Posts
    3,121
    I'm not a big china fan BUT I second Lucretia's plug for replacements.com. I have looked at whole used china sets on their site, and you can find some nice vintage art deco sets from way back when. As for me, I instead like fine glassware and stick to plain bistroware for my dishes.

    k.
    "There's only one thing I hate more than lying…skim milk, which is water that's lying about being milk." -- Ron Swanson

  4. #24
    Senior Member AFKitchenknivesguy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    California
    Posts
    1,044
    Quote Originally Posted by mkriggen View Post
    Mikasa, su casa Bet you never heard that one before

    I seem to remember Mikasa having a pattern called "Threads" back in the late 90's that I liked, but generally I perfer some hand thrown stoneware to fine china. If you're ever around Colorado Springs there's a big artist community outside town (at least there was 10yrs ago) where you can pickup some real nice pieces (or sets), or get some made to order. And yes Marko, they are much more durable then Wedgewood.
    Are you talking about Manitou Springs?
    Jason

  5. #25
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Hawaii
    Posts
    1,427
    Quote Originally Posted by mkriggen View Post
    Mikasa, su casa Bet you never heard that one before

    I seem to remember Mikasa having a pattern called "Threads" back in the late 90's that I liked, but generally I perfer some hand thrown stoneware to fine china. If you're ever around Colorado Springs there's a big artist community outside town (at least there was 10yrs ago) where you can pickup some real nice pieces (or sets), or get some made to order. And yes Marko, they are much more durable then Wedgewood.
    I like glazed stoneware too,some of the colors are stunning.Last christmas fare bought a 16" platter wt. light blue green turquoise glaze.Also got 3 large glazed coffeemugs all slightly diff.

  6. #26
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Cairns. Australia.
    Posts
    410
    Quote Originally Posted by mzer View Post
    I disagree with this. The choice to use bone china over porcelain is mainly a choice between English or continental aesthetic and tradition. English use bone because they did traditionally, and Anglophile makers outside England will. Meissen (German) and Limoges (French) use hard paste traditionally and still do so. I don't know that you can make an overall quality statement about bone vs porcelain. They are just slightly different, and have different traditions.
    I meant it as a very general statement.I have not encountered any low quality bone china but I have seen plenty low quality porcelain.You clearly have a much greater knowledge on the subject than I do.Would you consider Meissen to be superior to Serves.?

  7. #27
    Yeah, you are right here. There is almost no low quality bone china I can think of and a lot of low to mid quality porcelain.

    Do you mean Sevres vs Meissen as in the styles of making china or the individual (historical) makes? I don't know that I am knowledgeable enough to say that what is made in the German style is better or worse, though I think it is fair to say that we generally see only a higher end of German manufacture than French here. Historically, I understand that Sevres was great, but I don't know anything about collectible plates. Today I think I probably prefer Meissen, the company, to any other manufacturer, but I don't actually have any because they are a little incongruous with how we live.

    To add to an above post, there is still a lot of great Danish porcelain made, often with a really modern sensibility.

  8. #28
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Hamilton, Ontario
    Posts
    624
    My wife and I have a rather large collection of Royal Albert Val D'or china, it's plain and elegant with a gold rim.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •