Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 34

Thread: Sharpening advice wanted

  1. #1
    Senior Member Chefdog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Outside the Beltway
    Posts
    526

    Sharpening advice wanted

    After buying, trying and selling several kinds of stones over the last year and a half I've finally decided to consolidate to two stones and a strop.
    I'm thinking chosera 600 & 3k will give me what I'm looking for.
    Here's the question: I already have a chosera 400, so is there really any good reason to sell it and start over with the 600? Or just keep it cause it won't really make a noticeable difference?
    I'd you've used both, let me know what you think. Or if you think the 800 makes more sense with the 3K??
    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Columbia , MD
    Posts
    107
    Keep the 400 for bevel repair. Check out the gesshin 2000 . I was fortunate to try it out when i visited jon at jki and it was simply amazing. Cuts so freakin fast with nice mud and shwarf build up. Haha shwarf

  3. #3
    Senior Member Chefdog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Outside the Beltway
    Posts
    526
    I have no doubt the gesshin 2K is awesome. I had the 1&5k at one point, and the quality was very good.
    But I'm kinda set on the chosera because I don't want soakers, I really prefer a harder stone, and I don't want to go finer than 3-4k.
    If Jon's 4k wasn't a soaker, I'd go with it and the gesshin 600 splash and go.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Amstelveen, The Netherlands
    Posts
    2,304
    I use myself a Chosera 400, 800, 2k and 5k progression. No experience with the 600. I would suggest you to get the 800, it's a very versatile stone with a great reach. It corresponds more or less to a J1200.
    If possible keep the 400, not just for repairs. Some steels respond better if addressed with it.
    The 800 and 3k make a great combination. I must admit I'm somewhat biased by the low prices for the Choseras in Europe, and the absence of a real alternative here.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    65
    JKS 3K splash 'n go?

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Cardiff, UK
    Posts
    817
    I have the 400 and the 600 choseras, but don't have the 3k. The jump from 600 to 2k works ok as they're quick cutting stones. Not sure you'd need to drop to the 600 for touch ups though. 1k chosera will bring up a burr pretty quickly. If you already have a 400 I'd get a 1k and a finisher. That way you have the 400 for thinning and repair, the finisher for touch ups and the 1k to reset the bevels when it needs it.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Chefdog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Outside the Beltway
    Posts
    526
    Thanks for the replies guys.
    Benuser, thanks for the info on the 800. You think it cuts fast enough to handle minor repair and thinning jobs?

    TB- I'm trying to stick to 2 stones, one sub 1K, and one +\- 3K. That's where I'm trying to find out if the 600 or 800 make more sense as the coarsest stone when paired with the 3K. I have a diamond plate for really big repairs if needed Andy blades are all set up where I want them so I'm dealing with just maintenance thinning and keeping an edge.

    Thanks for the help.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Amstelveen, The Netherlands
    Posts
    2,304
    Quote Originally Posted by Chefdog View Post
    Thanks
    Benuser, thanks for the info on the 800. You think it cuts fast enough to handle minor repair and thinning jobs?
    Absolutely no problem. If your diamond plate leaves deep scratches you will still need the 400, though. As for large thinning operations with abrasion resistant stainless.

  9. #9
    The progression of stones you should use depends on the steel you are sharpening. Very hard Japanese steels are somewhat unforgiving of skipped grits and you will have a terrible time getting smooth, scratch free blades that are truely sharp. For something like typical German knife that isn't so hard, skipping grits is OK as the steel grinds away must faster.

    I have not used the Choseras, but I do have some experience with Naniwa Superstones, and since they are similar grit sizes, I would suggest you keep your 400, get an 800, and then a 1000 or 2000 and a 5000. Use the 400 to grind out minor chips and re-set bevels, the 800 for major touchup, and the 1000 or 2000 for routine sharpening followed by the 5000.

    Of course, what I'm using at the moment is a King 300 Deluxe for major re-work, a Bester 700 and 1200 for routine sharpening (the 1200 is fine for most re-sharpening, it cuts quite fast) and then on to a Naniwa 3000 Superstone, a 6000 grit King, and for real polish, a Kitayama. For normal knives, 3000 is as far as I go.

    Hope this helps. I really like the Besters, no slurry to speak of, just fast cutting and clean edges, but suit yourself, how one sharpens one's knives is a fairly personal thing.

    Peter

  10. #10
    The man is set to two stones.

    I totally understand cause that is what i usually use.

    As a regular sharpening goes, why to use 400/600 - so low grit range? You found it giving you the edge you digg or?

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •