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Thread: "Stainless" Gyuto 210mm, which one?

  1. #1
    Senior Member F-Flash's Avatar
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    "Stainless" Gyuto 210mm, which one?

    Ive been wanting to get one smaller stainless gyuto, basically because I just dont always have the time I want, to care for my knifes. Sometimes theres million things going on at the same time on your work. So Id like to have one knife, I can just leave wet and dirty for a while, if I must (still hate doing it).

    So, looking for stainless or at least semi-stainless gyuto 180-220 in size.

    I have 3 options ready, if someone could compare them, list some pros and cons or give me even better option, that would be awesome!

    Knifes Ive been thinking are:

    Yoshikane SKD
    Kurosaki R2
    Itinomonn Stainless

    Location: Finland, EU
    Budget: ~250€ (around 300$)
    Handle: Wa
    Knife: Gyuto, 180-220mm
    Steel: Stainless / semi stainless

    Thanks everyone!

  2. #2
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    Of the three, I'd almost certainly pick the Yoshikane. Itinomonn would probably be runner-up. Kurosaki...you'd need to find one that cuts well, and that can be a bit of a gamble, in my modestly-informed opinion (contrary to popular opinion).

    A good decision really depends on how heavy you want the knife to be, how you want it to handle, how thin you want the edge to be.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Matus's Avatar
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    The question is - what properties do you expect from the knife. I have Yoshikane SKD Hakata knife - the steel is hardened to about HRC63-64 and has incredible edge holding, but it also micro-chips more easily than other knives I have. The grind is a wide bevel grind and is not quite as thin as convex-ground blades are. I have not used the Itinomonn, but I would guess that it would be a better choice for hard vegetables. I am not trying to talk you away from Yoshikane, just trying to mention the differences. I like my Hakata a lot. I would just expect the Itinomonn to be a more universal knife. The Yoshikane will be pretty stiff knife based on my experience with the Hakata - that is a plus in my book. I do not know about the Itinomonn or the Kurosaki.

  4. #4
    Senior Member F-Flash's Avatar
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    Not looking for laser, nor a heavy workhorse, something from between. Is it called regular weight, maybe? If such thing exists with knives..

    Would like it to be thin behind the edge, looking for overall performer, that can get most tasks done.
    Edge retention is +, but I dont mind sharpening my knives more often, like doing that to be honest.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Matus's Avatar
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    For 210 gyuto medium weight would be somewhere around 180g I would say (for a knife with WA handle). The Yoshikane is little heavier than the Itinomonn, but both are on the lighter side. I do not know what steel the Itinomonn uses, but I would expect also very good edge holding.

    You may also consider knives that have carbon cutting edge and stainless cladding. Something like stainless-clad super blue would not be a bad option. I have a small Masakage Koishi ko-bunka (130mm) and it is a great little knife. Again - these are wide-bevel designs and not the most thin ones (though I have not used a gyuto from that line) - nice is that you can find them in Europe (cuttingedgeknives)

    Another interesting option could be Syousin Kurosaki knives from James (Knives&Stones) - see here or here. In particular the first one could be what you are looking for.

    Last but not least - I would also mention the stainless-clad Kochi knives from JKI.

    If any of the knives seem like they could fit the bill, I would recommend to contact the vendor and have a little chat - you will get an advice that will be taylored to your needs and maybe you will be pointed out to knives you would have overlooked.

    One thing needs to be mentioned - when leaving the knife wet for a little while (like a minute or 2) - the important thing is whether these are wet from clean water, or are covered with tomato or onion juice. The water is not a problem - in particular the cutting core (carbon steel) would not rust in such a short time. But if it is some acidic stuff, than you will see knife reacting to it. Still - even then you will not see rust developing.

    Most of my knives and carbon steel iron clad. I do not have problem using them without getting rust. So if you would turn to stainless-clad carbon core, than you would have a knife that is really easy to take care of.

  6. #6
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    I have one of these in 240 (actually 250), it's one of the best knives I have

    http://yhst-27988581933240.stores.ya...sld-st210.html

    Or the semi mirror finish (currently out of stock)

    http://yhst-27988581933240.stores.ya...teel-b210.html

  7. #7
    Senior Member preizzo's Avatar
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    Try the t f, best knife in that length, or the hinoura.
    Cleancut.se got a lot of new knives, have a look!
    Good luck

  8. #8
    Senior Member Badgertooth's Avatar
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    Kurosaki produces mixed reactions on this forum from people who love them or are completely indifferent. I'll come out in favour of the maker as a mid weight option. Though I can only speak to the stainless clad Aogami super. I find AS to be the least reactive of the hitachi steels and can take a really nice edge and hold it too. R2 is a lovely steel and I'd love to see how he treats it. Fine grained, gets crazy sharp, doesn't react, stays sharp. I have a wafer thin Kotetsu that doesn't chip out and is my least often sharpened knife. Ginsanko would be an awesome option too. Get one of the last 210 tanaka ginsanko gyutos from James at K&S, I get the feeling when they're gone, they're gonna be gone for a while. It's a lot of knife for the money. Or if you can stretch your budget a Konosuke Fujiyama ginsanko.

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    I like Itinomonn knives (love the 180mm nakiri), but i never used the stainless version (V2 carbon here). Besides, my gyutos are all of them bigger than 210mm. The gyutos feel much heavier than the nakiri, more like a workhorse type of knife. My 240mm gyuto, in my opinion, has a profile with more belly than i like while the 270mm has it flatter. Both and the nakiri cut great. Maybe someone who owns the stainless version can chime in. Another option that could fit in your "not a laser, not a heavy workhorse" description is a stainless clad Takeda, if you manage to find one without the recent geometry problems mentioned in this forum. If you go that route, i suggest you contact Tosho Knife Arts and ask for a very thin behind the edge 210mm NAS gyuto. The Takeda blades feel light for their size and cut awesome if you find the right one.

  10. #10
    Senior Member F-Flash's Avatar
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    Hmm..

    In the end I went totally different direction, and pulled tricker on Will Catcheside small mono gyuto.

    Guess I just have to get along without stainless gyuto, though I do have tojiro-DP 300mm, it's just not that practical always. Maybe I'll get that itinomonn next time Maksim gets those back on store.

    Thanks everyone for your advice, even though result was something totally different.

    Had small chat with James from knivesandstones, he suggested Shiro kamo R2, but that also has to wait for now.

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