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Thread: Rehandling a Shigefusa

  1. #21
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    Awesome job! Looks great! Mark, how is it in hand?

    -Chuck

  2. #22

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    Alright, I have to ask, I have issues when using steel wool with there being no backing and the wood wearing faster than the rivets. How do you prevent uneven wearing of the two materials when using steel wool? ( if you don't mind me asking)

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by kalaeb View Post
    Alright, I have to ask, I have issues when using steel wool with there being no backing and the wood wearing faster than the rivets. How do you prevent uneven wearing of the two materials when using steel wool? ( if you don't mind me asking)
    I also had this question.

  4. #24

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    Wood and metal wearing unevenly is a struggle pretty much regardless of your abrasive. As soon as you move into finer grits, unless you're working with super-sharp belts, it is pretty easy to start having the materials wear unevenly. The best solution that I've come up with is to have your belts very sharp. Once you're into the steel wool, if your sanding was done well, you're not removing enough material to make an change in the shape of the wood or metal. If you've got any remaining machining marks that you're trying to remove with the steel wool, you're pretty much out of luck.

    Closest analogy I can come up with is if you are sanding a pine board and you start with 600 grit and paper, working a long time on it, you would think it would eventually produce a beautifully smooth, straight piece of wood. Instead, it magnifies the unevenness caused by the grain in the wood. If you instead start at 80 grit and then move through 120, 220, 320, 400, and the 600, it will be perfectly smooth.

    I think steel wool is the same. Don't move to steel wool if there are still imperfections you're trying to fix. Only move onto the steel wool when the piece is pretty much as you want it ... just not as silky.

    -daniel

    Quote Originally Posted by kalaeb View Post
    Alright, I have to ask, I have issues when using steel wool with there being no backing and the wood wearing faster than the rivets. How do you prevent uneven wearing of the two materials when using steel wool? ( if you don't mind me asking)

  5. #25
    Senior Member cheflarge's Avatar
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    What a bute!

  6. #26
    Weird Wood Pusher Burl Source's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by danielomalley View Post
    If you instead start at 80 grit and then move through 120, 220, 320, 400, and the 600, it will be perfectly smooth.
    I think steel wool is the same. Don't move to steel wool if there are still imperfections you're trying to fix. Only move onto the steel wool when the piece is pretty much as you want it ... just not as silky.
    -daniel
    Very good advice.
    Mark Farley / It's a Burl
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  7. #27
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    Beautiful handle makes me want a western.

  8. #28

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    super!

  9. #29
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    Beautiful work. One more question about the steel wool. For some woods, steel wood "dust" can get pushed into the pores and will show up as discolorations (black dots) later when the steel reacts with the tannins in the wood - at least that has been my experience. A classic example is white oak which is also pretty course grained. Maybe finer grained or many "exotic" woods don't have that problem? Are there other woods that you have found don't work well with steel wool?

  10. #30

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    @kannamaster, I use steel wool only after I have applied several coats of super-thin cyano. This seals all the pores, making the steel wool not get caught in the grains. This might be why I don't encounter this problem.
    -daniel

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