Quantcast
Seeking handle finishing advice. - Page 3
+ Reply to Thread
Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 41

Thread: Seeking handle finishing advice.

  1. #21
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Colorado Springs
    Posts
    239
    While searching around I came across some wood turners that believed most finishes were 'food safe' after a certain amount of time. I read some of them would let bowls sit for a month then deem them OK for use. I don't know the technical aspect about it but the way I read was, like you can't drink paint but once dried/cured you could eat off of or use something painted.
    Keep your love outta my sauce.

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Stumblinman View Post
    While searching around I came across some wood turners that believed most finishes were 'food safe' after a certain amount of time. I read some of them would let bowls sit for a month then deem them OK for use. I don't know the technical aspect about it but the way I read was, like you can't drink paint but once dried/cured you could eat off of or use something painted.
    Its the volatile gasses/fluids in the finish that are usually the problem. If the finish doesn't cure completely (or is able to be dissolved)...they can be released into whatever it is you're eating. Most wood finishes cure completely with enough time.

    Its like cured concrete, you could eat off of it if you wanted to...but I wouldn't suggest eating it .
    I try to be the man I am..in times of broken lives. Shattered dreams and plans..standing up to fight. Pressures and demands..staring at the knife. Holding in your hands..

  3. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    186
    Quote Originally Posted by Stumblinman View Post
    . I don't know the technical aspect about it but the way I read was, like you can't drink paint but once dried/cured you could eat off of or use something painted.
    ...but you wouldn't want to eat the paint chips if they cracked off.....

    For many finishes it's more or less like Cris said. That assumes, though, that the resins/film being left behind is of a natural origin (eg tung oil, linseed oil) as opposed to a plastic/acrylic base (polyurethane, epoxy, acrylic etc). With the natural products, what you care most about are the volatile gasses/fluids that are solvents or binders in the mix. Once these are out-gassed and the resins in the finish are cured, most are food safe.
    One general exception (i think mentioned earlier in the string) is Boiled Linseed Oil. While linseed oil is safe, BLO often contains heavy metals as drying agents.

  4. #24
    Senior Member hobbitling's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    upstate New York
    Posts
    132
    Anybody use waterlox?

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by hobbitling View Post
    Anybody use waterlox?
    I've read that a LOT of guys swear by it...but I've never tried it myself.

    Its funny...I'd love to have a shot at all of these different methods of finishing...but when I have a handle that needs completed, the tried and true method I have already used is the one I go to. Its partially expedience, partially that its sufficient for my needs, and partially that all of these other finishes take effort to source lol.
    I try to be the man I am..in times of broken lives. Shattered dreams and plans..standing up to fight. Pressures and demands..staring at the knife. Holding in your hands..

  6. #26
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Posts
    186
    Quote Originally Posted by hobbitling View Post
    Anybody use waterlox?
    I use it a lot! It's one of my favorite finishing products. The stuff is great. My disclaimer is: I've used it mostly on furniture projects. I've built a lot of art deco and asian/modern influenced furniture over the years and Waterlox became part of my "go to" finishing schedule. I didn't have to spray it, it's easy to use and the results are always good. My procedure, minus all the sanding stages is typically: shellac coat to seal and pop the grain first, then couple coats of Waterlox original wiped on by hand, after that's dried and any bubbles/issues are sanded at high grit to smooth, one coat of waterlox thinned about 20% ...after that's cured out, finally, I hit it with a homemade paste wax that is a mix of beeswax, mineral oil and linseed oil (supposedly a similar wax recipe was used by Sam Maloof and Nakashima on furniture). The process is time consuming but really easy and the result of the combination is a silky finish that looks amazing.

    On handles and sayas - I just finished my first effort at a "high end" D- handle. I used Waterlox as the finish on it (same as above, minus the shellac coat) and it looks great. Not sure how it will hold up to regular use yet but having seen Waterlox as a finish on high traffic hardwood floors, expect it to be plenty durable.

    two notes on waterlox -- it leaves an amber tone ... great if you want an antique finish or don't mind the slight color shift. People usually see a waterlox finished product and think it has a slight patina from age. Second, even though dry in a day, it can take a good week to ten days to fully gas out and cure.
    I usual wait at least a week before buffing/polishing or adding any wax topcoat.

  7. #27
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    123
    Quote Originally Posted by CrisAnderson27 View Post
    Its funny...I'd love to have a shot at all of these different methods of finishing...but when I have a handle that needs completed, the tried and true method I have already used is the one I go to. Its partially expedience, partially that its sufficient for my needs, and partially that all of these other finishes take effort to source lol.
    This is the same mentality that I have. As they say, a bird in the hand is worth two in the bush.
    I've re-handled a few of my knives; I sand to #400, buff lightly with Pink Buffing compound and call it a day!

  8. #28
    Senior Member zitangy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    SIngapore
    Posts
    470
    Quote Originally Posted by CrisAnderson27 View Post
    I use teak oil...rubbed in and sanded off through my last three finishing grits (I stop at 2000). Then I buff with simple beeswax on a loose buff.

    I've been considering looking into the Bealls Buff kit. The results seem pretty incredible over oiled and rubbed finishes.
    I tried that.. the kit comes with the buffing wheels and adaptors and brick compounds.. red and white. I do not like the white compound as it is supposed to be laced with diamond dusts if I am not mistaken as breathing it in wld not be healthy. The carnuba wax brick.. THis I like .

    Had my time polishing wooden bowls and a few handles

    These days... I just sandpaper it quickly, clean it and oil it and later use sort of a shellac.. quick dry in 20 minutes, white latex looking liquid and wipe whatever wooden items that's in sight. Objective is to repel water and it is always better looking than the previous state..

    rgds
    d

  9. #29
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    80
    Saphir Medaille D'Or Neutral shoe polish/wax

    Turpentine
    Beeswax
    Carnauba

  10. #30
    Senior Member richinva's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    58
    Bowlturner here.................

    I use Danish oil on most of my non-utilitarian bowls, vases, etc. that I turn, allow to dry several days, then buff with tripoli, white diamond (not for dark woods), and wax with Renaissance Wax. Utility bowls get walnut oil and sun-cured for several days.

    The Ren Wax, unlike carnauba, doesn't leave fingerprints.

    I've also found that a wash coat of de-waxed shellac (1 1/2-2# cut) will not "amber up" the wood as much as an oil finish will, so I generally use shellac first, then follow with one of the above. It seems to give a more natural color. I really like Waterlox on cherry furniture, but it's too much trouble for lathe work, at least for me.

    I rarely sand past 600 anymore, and usually will stop at 400, depending on the piece. I buff the shellac off with a white Scotchbrite pad or 4/0 steel wool. Building up heat here is bad, so go slowly.

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts