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Thread: Heiji spa day

  1. #11
    Looks good

  2. #12



    Looks great!

  3. #13
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    Looking good, do you end up with a crisp shinogi at the top of the bevel, like with a yanagiba, or is it more of a blended transition?

  4. #14
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    the Heiji gyutos don't have a shinogi the same way a yanagi does. it's pretty crisp as seen here, but it has more blend. the trick is to only grind below the line.

  5. #15
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    So beautiful. Way more beautiful than mine. However, Heijis are a thing of beauty unto themselves no matter what so mine's is still purdy

  6. #16
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    I understand that the Heiji gyuto has a mostly flat blade from the spine to the shinogi and then a larger than usual bevel to the cutting edge. Now this might seem a silly question but being new and just learning how to sharpen Jknives I have to ask anyway. What happens if you thin above the shinogi of a Heiji? In other words you blend the shinogi and get rid of the firm and well delineated line while thinning it and giving it a hamaguri all the way up instead of stopping at the shinogi. Of course this would change the unique geometry of the Heiji but would it make the gyuto a more efficient cutter? Just curious.

  7. #17
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    having a hamaguri geomtry that far up the knife would make it thicker behind the edge than it needs to be. there is nothing special or magical about convexity, and it only makes sense in places where it makes sense.

    which do you think will cut better?

    this?



    or this?


  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by EdipisReks View Post
    having a hamaguri geomtry that far up the knife would make it thicker behind the edge than it needs to be. there is nothing special or magical about convexity, and it only makes sense in places where it makes sense.

    which do you think will cut better?

    this?



    or this?

    Yes I know but what if you start with the geometry of the Heiji (which is like your second picture here) and then blend in the part around the shinogi where there is an angle between the bevel and the rest of the blade above the shinogi? Won't that make it a thinner knife then?

  9. #19
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sambal View Post
    Yes I know but what if you start with the geometry of the Heiji (which is like your second picture here) and then blend in the part around the shinogi where there is an angle between the bevel and the rest of the blade above the shinogi? Won't that make it a thinner knife then?

    What you are describing wouldn't, and "hamaguri" is not what you are describing. Hamaguri is something thst makes sense on a single bevel knife (where the edge is going to be thin, due to the chisel grind on the face and the concavity on the back: i've always been under the impression that it's called a clam shell edge because its convex on one side and concave on the other, like a clam shell), and you want to (mainly) improve edge stability and/or add a (quite minor) tendency for food to not stick as much. This kind of convexity involves a lot more than blending bevels.

    What you are describing is a messed up Heiji, as the angle difference is part of what makes them so resistant to stickage: a nice big thin piece of potato can stick to the bevel, and it can stick to the flat, but it has a hard time sticking to both at the same time.

    Blending in the bevel to the flat allows Mr Potato slice to stick as much as he wants. Raising the line would make it thinner behind the edge, but then you would start getting more food stickage, as there is more bevel for things to stick to, which starts defeating the purpose. This is the balancing act. Both of my knives have wider bevels, and thus higher shinogis, than stock. I stopped raising the lines, and thus widening the bevels, when I decided stickage was being too adversely affected. Look at the choil shot I posted; I don't think the edge needs to be much thinner.

    Hope that clears it up. It's easy to understand with knife in hand.

  10. #20
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    Bending the bevel will give you a convex ground knife like most other knives, to some extent. It will cut better because there are no shoulders. However it's more difficult to thin and may have more stiction.

    Edipis, I understand hamaguri to refer to a closed clam. Convex coming to a point from both sides. Single bevel hamaguri is like half a clam.

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