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Thread: Gardeners - What's your favorite tomato?

  1. #51
    Senior Member orangehero's Avatar
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    You can pick up an 18 gal round tote for cheap.

  2. #52
    Senior Member larrybard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by orangehero View Post
    You can pick up an 18 gal round tote for cheap.
    Thanks for the suggestion. Hadn't thought of that possibility. (Truth is, didn't even immediately understand what a "tote" is and had to quickly Google it.) Will expand my search around the house for any such containers that might be available.

  3. #53
    Senior Member larrybard's Avatar
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    Frankly am torn between planting in some sort of container, away from predators, or planting in my backyard. I'd prefer the convenience of my backyard -- no hauling lots of soil up to my second floor balcony (though ideally I'd use soil that was purchased, and free from contamination -- insects, etc.). But the backyard would enable the roots to grow unrestricted. And I wouldn't have to worry about supporting potted plants that might well grow over six feet tall. But I worry that, despite perhaps chicken wire around the plants, any tomatoes would be enjoyed by raccoons, rabbits, deer, hedgehogs, birds and squirrels (and perhaps other animals that don't immediately come to mind). My backyard directly abuts Philadelphia's Fairmount Park, which has all the animals mentioned. So here's the question: if I surround the plants with stuff like cayenne, garlic powder, liquid soap and maybe even a commercial product like Shake-Away how likely do you think it is that I can ward off animals that would like to eat my tomatoes? Anyone have experience with effective repellents?

  4. #54
    Senior Member orangehero's Avatar
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    Only effective repellent is a gun or a fence. Also if you're going to grow in containers you need to use potting mix. It doesn't have any soil in it. Soil is too heavy and the plants will suffer...you need to use something that is light and airy. I like ProMix; it comes in a 3.8 cubic foot compressed bale.

  5. #55
    Senior Member larrybard's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by orangehero View Post
    . . . . Also if you're going to grow in containers you need to use potting mix. It doesn't have any soil in it. Soil is too heavy and the plants will suffer...you need to use something that is light and airy.
    I'm going to give my backyard a try. But I'm curious about your comment concerning soil. I hope this isn't too naive of me -- I readily admit to having no gardening experience -- but if tomato plants can grow well in soil in one's backyard, why would the same soil be "too heavy" to use when planting tomatoes in pots? Does the soil somehow become compacted over time in a pot?

  6. #56
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    Annas Russian
    Purple Calabash
    Black Cherry
    Berner Rose

  7. #57
    Weird Wood Pusher Burl Source's Avatar
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    Just planted a couple Green Zebras and San Marzanos

    As for keeping the deer away;
    Used to have a neighbor who would urinate around the outside edges of his garden. He said it would keep the deer away.
    My thoughts were that he was always drinking beer and just too lazy to go inside to pee.
    Mark Farley / It's a Burl
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  8. #58
    Senior Member DDPslice's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by larrybard View Post
    I'm going to give my backyard a try. But I'm curious about your comment concerning soil. I hope this isn't too naive of me -- I readily admit to having no gardening experience -- but if tomato plants can grow well in soil in one's backyard, why would the same soil be "too heavy" to use when planting tomatoes in pots? Does the soil somehow become compacted over time in a pot?
    The answer is in books, way too may variables to explain. But something brief because your reading this. Love. The more you give the more you get. But seriously it has to do with how the plant roots breathe and root rot, ph levels yada yada yada...

    Cherry tomatoes all the way. I dont know why they are just so addicting.

  9. #59
    Senior Member larrybard's Avatar
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    DDPslice, I'll take your word for it. It is academic at this point, inasmuch as I did plant the tomatoes in my backyard, rather than pots (and would probably do so again, in future years, if this year's first time experiment turns out reasonably successful). I started extremely modestly, going to my local Primex and purchasing one mortgage lifter and two Cherokee purple plants. After a disheartening setback -- looked like deer evidently sneaked into my backyard one night and ravaged my plants -- they have rebounded, after I trimmed back the damaged limbs. (But they remain unprotected; waiting for 6' metal stakes to arrive at my local Walmart, so I can put up deer mesh fencing, but that will probably be too late to make much of a difference. Was tempted to track down Mark's neighbor and ask him to pee in my backyard, but decided that might well be impractical.) The mortgage lifter is particularly impressive: over a dozen tomatoes developing, currently about golf-ball size. I need to read about about pruning and what I have to do to support the soon to be much heavier branches, but it is exciting to see the progress. I will be devastated if I get closer to harvesting mature tomatoes, only to have them destroyed by birds, squirrels, groundhogs, rabbits or some other animal.

  10. #60
    Senior Member DDPslice's Avatar
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    Gardeners - What's your favorite tomato?

    Trying making a tea with rosemary and spraying the plants for bugs and a tea of wormwood for the animals, rabbits are destroying my mint and this should do the trick. But I haven't tried the wormwood tea spray yet. Also deer are very smart and will get past fencing if it's not sturdy and locked. But maybe your deer are docile, good luck!

    Also I would look into vermicomposting aka earth worm farm. Nothing will come close to a better yield when you use the worm tea (worm pee, not boiling the worms) We had this at our community garden when I was in college. Make sure your in the right zone for this because being in a zone 8, it is just too hot for them outside and we had them inside. Which is fine if you keep the farm healthy and will smell of fresh earth, else it will smell like a compost heap, and your worms won't be happy either.

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