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Thread: Art vs Artist who are terrible people.

  1. #21
    .... i think you have to be crazy to be an artist of any kind.

  2. #22
    Senior Member Salty dog's Avatar
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    You have to be crazy not to be.

  3. #23
    Senior Member tkern's Avatar
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    Depends on degree of crazy. And who the f is sane? Everyone has their individual ticks. Haruki Murakami and Steve Erickson have written some the best literature in recent years and they're just "average" people. Some people can produce amazing things because they're educated on what came before them or have educated themselves and put their own experiences into it, learned from it, and went on from there. Beautiful works aren't just bi-products of being off kilter. There is a lot of hard work that goes into it.

    This conversation is still continuing in my house. We've moved onto why certain artistic fields tend to produce or not produce offspring that follow in those footsteps. For instance, many parents who are musicians tend to have children who are musicians but people who are painters or writers don't have children that follow in those areas but choose to follow an artistic path in another way. I thought it came down to regement, just like military families tend to be military families and people would work in restaurants tend to raise kids that work in restaurants.

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Salty dog View Post
    You have to be crazy not to be.

    Inspired by God, Forged by Fire, Tempered by Water, Grounded by Earth, Guided by the spirit.. Randy Haas

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  5. #25
    Senior Member Seth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tkern View Post
    We've moved onto why certain artistic fields tend to produce or not produce offspring that follow in those footsteps. For instance, many parents who are musicians tend to have children who are musicians but people who are painters or writers don't have children that follow in those areas but choose to follow an artistic path in another way. I thought it came down to regement, just like military families tend to be military families and people would work in restaurants tend to raise kids that work in restaurants.
    Jewish mothers are the only mothers who have the chutzpa to yell at their children to stop playing half ball and get in the house and practice, producing many of the great violinists and pianists. Except for Italian mothers in S. Philly or Brooklyn who scream: YO, Joey, get in here and practice...Mama, keep your pants on, I'm doin something here.

    Regarding OP: There has been a long-standing discussion about whether a work of art can stand alone, tapping into a universal aspect of the human mind (formalism/structuralism) or whether art needs to be understood in its historical/cultural context. If the former, Wagner's views wouldn't bother you; if the latter, then they might. There is a story about Stan Getz playing for some isolated mid east tribal group and they only heard noise; and one about some isolated groups not being able to "read" black and white photos. Meaning that you had to learn how to interpret in a symbolic way. So whether you like it or not, art appreciation required historical/cultural context.

    Still, I wonder why music playing is "inheritable" and why painters and writers, not so much...
    Everywhere you go, there you are.

  6. #26
    Senior Member Lucretia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salty dog View Post
    You have to be crazy not to be.
    +1

    As far as music being inherited goes, music is a lot like language. You have grammar that tells you how loud, how long, the order of phrases, etc. Just as children in a multilingual home pick up languages, children in a musical home probably pick up music. It's another form of aural communication that they are exposed to from an early age.

    We've had the conversation that music and software code are the same. They're symbolic languages with instructions that tell you what to do & when to do it (and music even has "go tos", "do whiles", and other control structures.) Some universities even accept software as a substitute for a foreign language credit. If they're going to recognize software that way, they should do the same for music.
    Now is not the time to bother me. And it's always now. Wiley Miller

  7. #27
    Senior Member tkern's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lucretia View Post
    +1
    We've had the conversation that music and software code are the same. They're symbolic languages with instructions that tell you what to do & when to do it (and music even has "go tos", "do whiles", and other control structures.) Some universities even accept software as a substitute for a foreign language credit. If they're going to recognize software that way, they should do the same for music.
    You should look into CSounds. C++ programing turning equations and basic go to commands into some really amazing thngs.

  8. #28

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    For a wild take on why artists are nuts and why they do the crazy things they do, don't miss "Sacre Bleu: A Comedy d'Art" by Christopher Moore.

    http://www.amazon.com/Sacre-Bleu-Com.../dp/006177975X

    Or pick it up at the library.

  9. #29
    Senior Member Lucretia's Avatar
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    I really like some of Christopher Moore's early books--later ones, not so much. I'd given up on him as an author. Might have to pick this one up.
    Now is not the time to bother me. And it's always now. Wiley Miller

  10. #30

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    Moore appeals to a certain audience, but I've liked most of what he's written. You can always count on his books to be... different. I love the Bloodsucking Fiends series, The Gospel According to Biff, and some others. For me his books run from good to great. I liked Sacre Bleu, but I mentioned it because of the crazy artists subject.... I'll be the first to admit it might not be for everyone.

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