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Thread: Steering Problems

  1. #1
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    Steering Problems

    A few of my knifes are developing problems with steering when I'm cutting (I'm a leftie). They are 'pushing' me out of food when I'm cutting with them. I'm fairly sure thats its a problem with how I'm sharpening them, but I'm not sure what I'm doing. Anyone offer some insight?

  2. #2
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    1. Pics. 2. What knives? 3. What are your bevel angles?

  3. #3
    This is a guess since I don't know what knife we're talking about nor how you're sharpening it but I'd say that in most cases this can be fixed by sharpening at a lower angle on both sides (thinning the edge). You can, or may need to, go one step further and remove even more material from the left side edge (at an even lower angle) than initially done. Test as you go and tweak as necessary.

    I've had the luxury of having many lefties in my shop while we worked out their steering issues and the above always works.

    If that does work then you can conclude that you're sharpening angles were too shallow and/or that you sharpened by not following the asymmetry of the blade.

  4. #4
    I have a tendency to sharpen one side of the blade at a slightly different angle than the other (specifically lower angle on the left side). Since I'm right handed, it doesn't seem to be much of a problem other than not getting the heel of some knives sharp since I don't grind enough off on the left side.

    Check the bevel carefully on the knives you have trouble with to verify that you are actually reaching the edge on both sides an the bevel is appropriate. Some single bevel knives may benefit from a very slight bevel on the "straight" side, others may drive you nuts, I'm not all that familiar with them. Since they work like chisels, I can tell you it is much easier to "steer" a single bevel with a slight bevel on the other side. It will, however, nullify most of the reason for the single bevel, which is super thin straight cuts.

    I have trouble starting cuts exactly the way I want them to go, so maybe some work on initial knife position and motion will avoid needing to "steer" the knife as you cut.

    Sharper is better too, as I've discovered. Much easier to get a blade doing what you want it to when you don't have to shove hard to get it to cut....

    Peter

  5. #5
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    To the OP: IIRC your Carbonext in the BST section was heavily thinned on the right side. I've noticed because it's not the first thing you expect a left handed to do. Following Dave's idea it would now need some major thinning on the left side as well.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by psfred View Post
    I have a tendency to sharpen one side of the blade at a slightly different angle than the other (specifically lower angle on the left side). Since I'm right handed, it doesn't seem to be much of a problem other than not getting the heel of some knives sharp since I don't grind enough off on the left side.
    i prefer a more obtuse angle on the left side as it recenters the edge a little, reduces steering somewhat and greatly enhances edge stability, without any noticeable performance loss.

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