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Thread: Shun blue steel Kiritsuke

  1. #21
    Senior Member cclin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lefty View Post
    Jon might be the best person to answer this, though I could be wrong: does a knife that cuts fresh dove noodles need a blue steel core? I mean, how sharp and acute does the edge really need to be. In my experience, I just use...well...anything.
    yes, every snigle noodle need to be same wide...try that with your gyuto or Nakiri
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AOrqIFJTwdc
    Charles ***[All statements I made here only my personal opinion and nothing more!]*** & Please bare with me for my crappy English!!

  2. #22
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    Cut short noodles.
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  3. #23
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    I just read my post and I don't know what dove noodles are.
    09/06

    Take a look around at: www.sharpandshinyshop.com

    Email me at: tmclean@sharpandshinyshop.com

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpikeC View Post
    Cut short noodles.


    And at 9.75 oz, it's not heavy enough, either.

  5. #25
    Can we get back on track, for a street price of $249 the listed knife looks good value

    just curious if anyone has actually used one

  6. #26
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by welshstar View Post
    Can we get back on track, for a street price of $249 the listed knife looks good value

    just curious if anyone has actually used one
    just so you know, you could get a tanaka for about $80 less in blue steel and a zakuri for 60-70 less also in blue 1. oh yeah, the yoshihiro store on ebay offers a blue kurouchi gyuto for alot less as well, i could go on and on...if youre looking at stainless clad carbon check out itonomon at JNS http://www.japanesenaturalstones.com...ves-s/1878.htm
    theres no way i would buy something like this without trying it out first to make sure that its a comfortable knife to use. sorry, i havent used one myself but i wouldnt mind testing one. considering shuns track record, i would be skeptical

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by labor of love View Post
    just so you know, you could get a tanaka for about $80 less in blue steel and a zakuri for 60-70 less also in blue 1. oh yeah, the yoshihiro store on ebay offers a blue kurouchi gyuto for alot less as well, i could go on and on...if youre looking at stainless clad carbon check out itonomon at JNS http://www.japanesenaturalstones.com...ves-s/1878.htm
    theres no way i would buy something like this without trying it out first to make sure that its a comfortable knife to use. sorry, i havent used one myself but i wouldnt mind testing one. considering shuns track record, i would be skeptical
    Well, theoretically, he was inquiring about the kiritsuke versus a gyuto or some other style of knife in blue steel.

    Now, I'm not sure if the Shun piece is a traditional kiritsuke possessing the single bevel versus what you would find on, say, Takeda's or Moritaka's or most of the products being offered as "kiritsukes", which are simply sword tipped shaped gyutos. However, in looking at the Shun unit, I'm inclined to believe that it's a double bevel and it does possess a gentle upsweep at the forward 1/3 of the blade, so it's really not what one would consider a functioning "true" kiritsuke, either as a traditional single bevel or double bevel gyuto type.

    The one comparative piece that comes to mind is the Takayuki Grand Cheff 260mm kiritsuke in the AEB-L Swedish stainless steel, which can be found for approximately the same street price as the Shun Blue item, with the Takayuki being a traditional single bevel blade. Most of the other true kiritsukes are pretty pricey from what I've seen, running in the neighborhood of $350+. As well, true single bevel Japanese kiritsukes possess a much narrower profile than what people expect from a main usage chef knife. I don't know if a short profiled, long, single bevel knife is what a lot of us Westerners would pick up first in the kitchen to do most of our work with.

    I personally use a 240 mm kiritsuke styled gyuto quite a bit, nearly on a daily basis in the kitchen. I've found that it's a pretty well rounded knife in terms of rapidly transitioning from a veggie prep blade to protein slicer. The flatter profile takes some getting used to, but I enjoy it even when I'm doing a lot of prep work on veggies or slicing a bunch of protein. (I did have to remove the forge slag kurouchi finish to have it be more effective when working with proteins and the 240mm length isn't enough on the larger cuts of meat, which usually has me switching over to a 300mm pro-style Shun slicer as the rounded tip prevents me from constantly inserting a sharp point into my left hand when I'm booking through 200 flanks or tenderloins.)

    And I'm not sure what you mean by Shun's "track record." Other than attempting to appeal to a wider range of potential customers and subsequently bringing more people into the concept and usage of traditional Japanese style blades/steels, I don't see the reason for the stated skepticism. I've enjoyed some of their products a lot (the previously mentioned 300mm pro slicer and their bread knife are excellent). No, they aren't hand made, but a lot of people will take consistency and quality over exclusivity.

    However, to answer the OP's original question:

    A 250mm kiritsuke style gyuto in blue steel that has a mirror polished stainless cladding, a wa handle, potentially very good to excellent fit and finish and an accompanying saya for $250? Sounds pretty good to me.

  8. #28
    Senior Member Chuckles's Avatar
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    My 07 Charger is sad now....
    I had a feeling I might be hearing from you on that one.

    To clarify, I like the knife and I like dodge chargers but I just know if I was actually out shopping I wouldn't come home with either of them.

    If I could be even half as picky with cars as I am with knives....

    The shun was comparable on the stones to the few other blue steel knives I've played with (tanaka, moritaka). By far the best shun I've handled.

    This thread is making want to look into Kiritsukes now.
    'The only real security that a man can have in this world is a reserve of knowledge, experience, and ability.' -Henry Ford

  9. #29
    I hate shuns, I loathe them. But I actually like the profile of that knife. I prefer a kiritsuke over a gyuto in general, thinner, better control and more dexterity. But I wouldn't go with a shun if that is what you are looking for. There are better makers with kiritsukes at a comparable price to that. I can't really think of any in blue steel off the top of my head as I try to avoid it, I'm not a fan of blue.

  10. #30
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Saccogoo View Post
    Well, theoretically, he was inquiring about the kiritsuke versus a gyuto or some other style of knife in blue steel.

    Now, I'm not sure if the Shun piece is a traditional kiritsuke possessing the single bevel versus what you would find on, say, Takeda's or Moritaka's or most of the products being offered as "kiritsukes", which are simply sword tipped shaped gyutos. However, in looking at the Shun unit, I'm inclined to believe that it's a double bevel and it does possess a gentle upsweep at the forward 1/3 of the blade, so it's really not what one would consider a functioning "true" kiritsuke, either as a traditional single bevel or double bevel gyuto type.

    The one comparative piece that comes to mind is the Takayuki Grand Cheff 260mm kiritsuke in the AEB-L Swedish stainless steel, which can be found for approximately the same street price as the Shun Blue item, with the Takayuki being a traditional single bevel blade. Most of the other true kiritsukes are pretty pricey from what I've seen, running in the neighborhood of $350+. As well, true single bevel Japanese kiritsukes possess a much narrower profile than what people expect from a main usage chef knife. I don't know if a short profiled, long, single bevel knife is what a lot of us Westerners would pick up first in the kitchen to do most of our work with.

    I personally use a 240 mm kiritsuke styled gyuto quite a bit, nearly on a daily basis in the kitchen. I've found that it's a pretty well rounded knife in terms of rapidly transitioning from a veggie prep blade to protein slicer. The flatter profile takes some getting used to, but I enjoy it even when I'm doing a lot of prep work on veggies or slicing a bunch of protein. (I did have to remove the forge slag kurouchi finish to have it be more effective when working with proteins and the 240mm length isn't enough on the larger cuts of meat, which usually has me switching over to a 300mm pro-style Shun slicer as the rounded tip prevents me from constantly inserting a sharp point into my left hand when I'm booking through 200 flanks or tenderloins.)

    And I'm not sure what you mean by Shun's "track record." Other than attempting to appeal to a wider range of potential customers and subsequently bringing more people into the concept and usage of traditional Japanese style blades/steels, I don't see the reason for the stated skepticism. I've enjoyed some of their products a lot (the previously mentioned 300mm pro slicer and their bread knife are excellent). No, they aren't hand made, but a lot of people will take consistency and quality over exclusivity.

    However, to answer the OP's original question:

    A 250mm kiritsuke style gyuto in blue steel that has a mirror polished stainless cladding, a wa handle, potentially very good to excellent fit and finish and an accompanying saya for $250? Sounds pretty good to me.
    really, i cant tell if the op was interested in the shun because a) it has a kiritsuke tip or b) its made of blue steel or c) its stainless cladding
    i listed knives with better track records and in the case of zakuri and itinomonn much better customer support and that are much cheaper
    i think you will find plenty of skepticism around here concerning shuns heat treat track record and inherent difficulty in sharpening both its vg10 lines and sg2 lines. FWIW, i sharpen knives from both of these steels by this maker for my friends all the time, it can be done, but as a knife knut i must say i dont enjoy it. but if that isnt the case with this blue steel line, well then good for you guys maybe shun is taking a step in the right direction.
    if you want a stainless clad, blue steel, kiritsuke tipped, massed produced chef knife that comes with a saya for $249 then please by all means accept no other substitute and go with the shun blue steel. I was only attempting to demonstrate there are other fish in the sea.

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