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Thread: Shigefusa help

  1. #21
    Im in with

    AEB-L (Devin)
    52100 carbon steel core with 416 stainless steel sides (Burke)
    1084 and 15N20 (Pierre)
    White Core, Stainless laminated (Carter)

  2. #22
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    It's ok dude, take your time. It gives me more time to save up some $$ lol.

  3. #23
    Marko Tsourkan's Avatar
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    I believe Bill tests his knvies, so you can get the performance info from him.


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  4. #24

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    I have a 240 Shigefusa (wa handle) and the ITK 240 wa. I don't know that I've used and sharpened them enough to have a bullet-proof opinion, but here's my experience to date. First, the Shigefusa is a much larger knife in the same 'size.' IIRC, I measured my Shigefusa at a cutting edge of 255 mm, whereas the ITK is less than 240; height of the Shigefusa is also substantially greater, so you're getting 'more' knife with the Shigefusa in the same 'size'. Side-by-side, the ITK almost looks like a sujihiki compared to the Shigefusa. [However, I think the western handled ITK do measure larger than their wa-handled brethren.]

    I also find the Shigefusa seems to hold a better edge; I find the ITK edge tends to roll over a bit faster when hitting the cutting board. Perhaps this is just due to the original edge weakness from the hardening/tempering process of the ITK.

    I find myself using the Shigefusa more often; the one thing, however, as noted by others, is the reactivity of the Shigefusa cladding. My wife and I have a favorite dish that uses alot of very thin cut cucumber; let me just say that the stink created by the Shigefusa when cutting cukes is amazing. Even after doing the darkhoek patination, the cukes still create a smell. No real problem with onions, but cukes..... So, for this dish I use the ITK. It it a very nice knife, great F&F, and I am glad to have it, but I prefer the Shigefusa for most tasks. However, I don't know that I would pay the freight for a western handled Shigefusa, as the upcharge is huge. I would recommend trying a Shigefusa wa, if you love the blade then you can sell it (or not!) if you really want a western handled version.

  5. #25
    Senior Member Cadillac J's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lancep View Post
    I find the ITK edge tends to roll over a bit faster when hitting the cutting board. Perhaps this is just due to the original edge weakness from the hardening/tempering process of the ITK.
    Have you sharpened your DT? How would you rate your sharpening proficiency?

    The only reason I ask is because the last thing I would of said the ITKs do is roll their edges...and that's even when really thinning it out.

  6. #26
    Senior Member rockbox's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cadillac J View Post
    Have you sharpened your DT? How would you rate your sharpening proficiency?

    The only reason I ask is because the last thing I would of said the ITKs do is roll their edges...and that's even when really thinning it out.
    +1

    I do know that the new ITKs are a lot thinner than the first batch but I don't see why the edge would roll. Where the knifes sharpened at the same angle?
    "Insanity: doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results." --Albert Einstein

  7. #27

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    I have maintained the factory angle on both of the knives; I have not taken them down to any lower grits, have just used a Chocera 10k for touch ups, plus stropping on HA green solution on leather.

    Again, it may be the ITK suffers from edge weakness due to the hardening/tempering process; the edge has definitely rolled in spots, since I can see it in the proper light and also feel it with my fingertip.

    When I get the time, I may take the ITK down to a 1k or so level and work it back up.

    My sharpening skills are, IMO, quite good though no doubt below those of some here. I do leather working, which requires very sharp knives and frequent re-sharpening, so I get a fair amount of practice.

  8. #28
    There seems to be a huge variety of experience here. I've got a 240 western handle kasumi Shigefusa gyuto. I've built up little more than natural patina from regular use and have almost no reactivity issues at all. Whether with onions, acidic fruit (grapefruit, lemons, limes), or cukes I get no black gunk. I do sometimes get a little reactive orange/brown gunk built up on the sides of the blade, but it cleans off easily and none sticks to the food or affects smell or taste.

    For care, I just wash the knife off with hot water and soap, dry it thoroughly, and usually give it a quick wipe with camellia oil before storing in the block.

    I can't comment on DT's knives (other than to say they're gorgeously photogenic and have a marvelous rep), but the Shigefusa has been nothing but a joy to use. While thick at the bolster it has a famous distal-taper and thins to a whisper towards the blade edge. It takes a frighteningly sharp edge VERY easily, has beautiful balance and weight in the hand and is easy to maintain. I finally talked my wife (who typically uses MAC pros) into trying it and she didn't want to put it down despite it being a lot longer and heavier than she's accustomed to.

    I like it so much I'm taking one of Marko's 150 wa-pettys.

  9. #29
    Senior Member Cadillac J's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by lancep View Post
    When I get the time, I may take the ITK down to a 1k or so level and work it back up.

    My sharpening skills are, IMO, quite good
    If you feel comfortable in your skills, my suggestion would be to start at your coarse stone and grind your own edge into your ITK through your regular progression--it will turn into a much different beast than it currently is, will be a much better comparison point to your Shig, and you shouldn't have any issues with the edge rolling.

    I had one from the first batch that were a bit thicker, and I thinned behind the edge which very significantly improved cutting performance without sacrificing toughness.

  10. #30

    stereo.pete's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cadillac J View Post
    If you feel comfortable in your skills, my suggestion would be to start at your coarse stone and grind your own edge into your ITK through your regular progression--it will turn into a much different beast than it currently is, will be a much better comparison point to your Shig, and you shouldn't have any issues with the edge rolling.

    I had one from the first batch that were a bit thicker, and I thinned behind the edge which very significantly improved cutting performance without sacrificing toughness.
    I currently own the ITK that Jarrod is talking about and I can attest to the cutting performance of the knife. It is the sharpest knife out of my collection and continues to amaze me with the edge that Jarrod put on it.

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