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Question on AEB-L (Artifex) in sharpening and edge retention [vs Forschner] - Page 6
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Thread: Question on AEB-L (Artifex) in sharpening and edge retention [vs Forschner]

  1. #51
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    I finally got around to start the thinning project last week. I was using p220 grit wetordry sandpaper I had. I used it wet on a pretty flat and lacquered piece of 1"x6" (having it wet was the only to keep it from sliding around). It was pretty slow in my opinion, spent maybe 30-40 minutes, used up probably 40-50% of the paper, thinning a good 3cm up the side of the blade. It still looks like a long way to go.

    Is there any problem to use the rubber kitchen cabinet lining as backing for the paper, and dry? I'm okay with the convexing, but will any problems arise from thinning too extensively with soft backing? For me, that is the most efficient way to keep it from sliding around, and the ability to use dry paper.

    I went to the automotive parts store, of the wetordry paper, the coarsest they have is the 200. They have non-wet coarser paper, may get that if it's okay to use dry with the rubber lining.

    BTW, thanks for all the replies!

  2. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by Ucmd View Post

    THis has got to be a joke. You could split wood with that. Dont waste time trying to fix....take it out to the wood shop.
    Holy crap. I couldn't get those pictures to load. That's insane. My all purpose, work/beater EDC is thinner behind the edge than that by over half...


    Quote Originally Posted by GConcept999 View Post
    I finally got around to start the thinning project last week. I was using p220 grit wetordry sandpaper I had. I used it wet on a pretty flat and lacquered piece of 1"x6" (having it wet was the only to keep it from sliding around). It was pretty slow in my opinion, spent maybe 30-40 minutes, used up probably 40-50% of the paper, thinning a good 3cm up the side of the blade. It still looks like a long way to go.

    Is there any problem to use the rubber kitchen cabinet lining as backing for the paper, and dry? I'm okay with the convexing, but will any problems arise from thinning too extensively with soft backing? For me, that is the most efficient way to keep it from sliding around, and the ability to use dry paper.

    I went to the automotive parts store, of the wetordry paper, the coarsest they have is the 200. They have non-wet coarser paper, may get that if it's okay to use dry with the rubber lining.

    BTW, thanks for all the replies!
    I'd defer to these guys when it comes to thinning by hand, as I use a belt sander myself. However, I'd suggest that you use a hard, flat backing for the majority of your work. This will help the paper cut better, and will also show you where your lines are more readily. Once you're close or even done with the actual thinning, use the soft backing to blend in the scratches and restore the convex shape.

    Another suggestion is to use black sharpie to help you keep track of where you're abrading steel. Sometimes its really easy to get stir crazy and oversand somewhere you didn't intend to. Just draw some diagonal lines across the blade, and as they abrade away, redraw them in.

    Something like this:



    This is an extreme example of course, but you see what I mean.

    Anyhow, I hope my comments were helpful. You've seriously got your hands full thinning that thing without power tools, lol.

  3. #53
    Senior Member zitangy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GConcept999 View Post
    I finally got around to start the thinning project last week. I was using p220 grit wetordry sandpaper I had.

    Is there any problem to use the rubber kitchen cabinet lining as backing for the paper, and dry? I'm okay with the convexing, but will any problems arise from thinning too extensively with soft backing? For me, that is the most efficient way to keep it from sliding around, and the ability to use dry paper.

    I went to the automotive parts store, of the wetordry paper, the coarsest they have is the 200. They have non-wet coarser paper, may get that if it's okay to use dry with the rubber lining.

    BTW, thanks for all the replies!
    The course the grit the faster it cuts. I wld imagine that using a wet mode .. you get less friction and better finish where else in dry mode.. more friction, more cutting provided that teh sandpaper is cleaned to remove the clogged pores. a) lightly tapping teh sand paper to loosen the trapped iron dust between the pores and getting rid of it from sandpaper.

    What grit size to use depends how much steel you desire to remove adn how fast.. and how much pressure you apply.

    Backing is for sturdiness adn safety. I usually put the knife flat on teh glass piece, with a twisting motion for teh edge to be fully flushed against the glass top ( so tht you do not cut yr fingers(s) adn use a small piece of sandpaper with a backing to remove steel as this gives me granular control where i wish to remove steel.

    I suppose that you wld have to keep a steady eye on teh choil once in a while to know how much you have removed.. Check oftern enough so that you dont make it too thin.

    Eventually you will get reach the thinness that you desire.

    have fun.

    rgds
    d

  4. #54

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    yea you can't give up now!! pot odds, as they say.

    You could use a spray adhesive to keep the paper from sliding. 3M/ home depot variety should do. Or you could spray the paper to the cabinet liner, though it's unclear how that would work, but probably better than nothing.

    It's a barbaric task; get out the gorilla glue if you have to Maybe the tape first actually would be better. Gorilla tape might have a chance to hold. Finally, you could mechanically clamp the paper to a cinderblock, maybe in conjunction with the cabinet liner. Just a couple C clamps and wood strips at the north/south ends should hold it. It will cramp your workspace but it would surely hold.

    Good luck

  5. #55
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    You honestly would have been better off returning that knife it's a shame they even sold that knife as a Gyuto, however this is a good learning experience for sharpening.

    The gesshin 400 is a great stone but does dish quickly for thinning jobs. I'd go with a diamond plate first to remove most metal. Then refine with 400 then 1k. Then use your sand paper to refinish the blade start with like 400 make sure to remove all scratches before going on to each new piece. I'd go up to like800- 1000 or so.

  6. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgraeff View Post
    You honestly would have been better off returning that knife it's a shame they even sold that knife as a Gyuto, however this is a good learning experience for sharpening.

    The gesshin 400 is a great stone but does dish quickly for thinning jobs. I'd go with a diamond plate first to remove most metal. Then refine with 400 then 1k. Then use your sand paper to refinish the blade start with like 400 make sure to remove all scratches before going on to each new piece. I'd go up to like800- 1000 or so.
    I've come to the conclusion that if go through all that to get the Artifex up to the performance you want from it; you would have been better off buying a Carbonext.
    This is from first hand experience...


  7. #57
    Senior Member bahamaroot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chinacats View Post
    Congratulations on the accomplishment. It truly is shameful though that a new knife needs this much work.

    Cheers
    There is a reason this knife is only $75 and not $175. I thinned some with the first sharpening and a little more with the second. It's a great knife now.

  8. #58
    Senior Member chinacats's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bahamaroot View Post
    There is a reason this knife is only $75 and not $175. I thinned some with the first sharpening and a little more with the second. It's a great knife now.
    The problem is not that it can't be fixed; it is that it is being sold as great for a beginner. No beginner wants to go through that just to get a knife that cuts. Many better knives (ready to use) for a small increase in price.

    Cheers to you for fixing yours!
    one man gathers what another man spills...

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