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Thread: Takeda handheld sharpening stone.

  1. #11
    BTW, what is a good stone for AS steel at 1,000 and 6,000 grit?

  2. #12
    AS doesn't like to move for mid-grit stones, a mistake is to use something too fine to get started with so I'd vote for something coarser than 1k for the low end.

  3. #13
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    AS is kinda hard haha. I have to use a 500 as my starting stone on my Hiromoto AS The rest of the stones are kinda like clean-up stones.

  4. #14
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    Dave, this is along the same lines. I haven't used white steel yet, and I have bot white 1 and 2 on their way to me. What stone is a good "starting stone" with whites?
    So far, 1k is doing a perfect job on my Swedish steels (carbon and stainless).
    Thanks, D-Mizzle!
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  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Lefty View Post
    Dave, this is along the same lines. I haven't used white steel yet, and I have bot white 1 and 2 on their way to me. What stone is a good "starting stone" with whites?
    So far, 1k is doing a perfect job on my Swedish steels (carbon and stainless).
    Thanks, D-Mizzle!

    Well I guess I'd suggest the same starting point no matter what steel you're sharpening, just that AS forces you to deal with it whereas the others often allow you to get by with a 1k to start, even if that 1k is simply not doing as good a job as a coarser stone would do in setting the bevel.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Martell View Post
    Well I guess I'd suggest the same starting point no matter what steel you're sharpening, just that AS forces you to deal with it whereas the others often allow you to get by with a 1k to start, even if that 1k is simply not doing as good a job as a coarser stone would do in setting the bevel.
    So I guess for typical home cooks, the Takeda stone at 800/1200 is good enough to start? And perhaps adding another 5k+ grit stone to finish?

  7. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Cnimativ View Post
    So I guess for typical home cooks, the Takeda stone at 800/1200 is good enough to start? And perhaps adding another 5k+ grit stone to finish?

    Depends, pick a fast wearing and/or slow cutting 800x and you won't be having any fun. The numbers mean almost nothing really, it's how a stone works that's of importance. If you're intent on getting the Takeda stone then you need to find out from someone who has one how it works.

  8. #18
    Senior Member dreamsignals's Avatar
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    not meaning to hijack the thread - regarding differences between same grit stones:

    dave (martell), can you elaborate on what you say on the JKS website, that you'd start a sharpening session with a bester 1000 or 1200 but not with a king?

    thanks!
    -thiago

  9. #19
    Senior Member Cadillac J's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cnimativ View Post
    But in terms of usability, it works. But it could be sharper to have its weight clean cut green onion, etc, instead of crushing and slice.
    Usability versus a proper sharp edge are two completely different things. I could take my ma's dullest knife and probably still get the job done, but it wouldn't be pretty.

    Green onion ends should easily be able to be cut without really changing their hollow shape and definitely without flattening them out---your cutting board should not be a necessity for the cut, as in this case it is leveraged for a 'pinch cut' between the edge pressing down against it. Not criticizing here...just trying to explain how a good edge should cut, and what to shoot for.



    Quote Originally Posted by Lefty View Post
    Dave, this is along the same lines. I haven't used white steel yet, and I have bot white 1 and 2 on their way to me. What stone is a good "starting stone" with whites?
    So far, 1k is doing a perfect job on my Swedish steels (carbon and stainless).
    Thanks, D-Mizzle!
    Start with your coarsest to set your bevel and work your way up. Chosera 600 and Bester 1200 are money with white#2 as far as coarse/medium stones go...and don't even get me started on how Naniwa SS feel with white#2--heaven.

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Martell View Post
    AS doesn't like to move for mid-grit stones, a mistake is to use something too fine to get started with so I'd vote for something coarser than 1k for the low end.
    Thanks for the tip, Dave! (and MarTel) I have the Takeda Banno Bunka and the Hiro AS and found that the higher end stones were not really doing a great job, as I started with the 6000 I got from you.

    Now I see I can and will go to lower grit.....500 Bester, then follow with 1200 Beston.

    This info was a GREAT help!

    Mitch

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