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Thread: Takeda handheld sharpening stone.

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by dreamsignals View Post
    not meaning to hijack the thread - regarding differences between same grit stones:

    dave (martell), can you elaborate on what you say on the JKS website, that you'd start a sharpening session with a bester 1000 or 1200 but not with a king?

    thanks!

    There's a a first time sharpening session with a knife and then a routine maintenance sharpening session with a knife. Once you've created your bevel with a coarse stone (sub 1k) then it's easy to follow up later on with a 1k stone, however, some 1k stones (IMO - like the King) cut way too slow and dish way too fast which then allows for multi-facets to be cut on the bevel (AKA - bevel rounding) and cause problems. So what I advise is to look for fast cutting stones at the lower levels.

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Silas View Post
    Thanks for the tip, Dave! (and MarTel) I have the Takeda Banno Bunka and the Hiro AS and found that the higher end stones were not really doing a great job, as I started with the 6000 I got from you.

    Now I see I can and will go to lower grit.....500 Bester, then follow with 1200 Beston.

    This info was a GREAT help!

    Mitch

    Many, many, many people go for the higher grit stones first but I've found the magic to be what the coarser stones do for you. If you don;t get this right then the higher grit stones do nothing for you.

  3. #23
    Senior Member dreamsignals's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Martell View Post
    There's a a first time sharpening session with a knife and then a routine maintenance sharpening session with a knife. Once you've created your bevel with a coarse stone (sub 1k) then it's easy to follow up later on with a 1k stone, however, some 1k stones (IMO - like the King) cut way too slow and dish way too fast which then allows for multi-facets to be cut on the bevel (AKA - bevel rounding) and cause problems. So what I advise is to look for fast cutting stones at the lower levels.
    got it. on that note, how do you (and others) feel about the shapton pro 1000?
    -thiago

  4. #24
    Senior Member Cadillac J's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Martell View Post
    There's a a first time sharpening session with a knife and then a routine maintenance sharpening session with a knife.
    As common as this seems for most of us, I think a lot of people newer to sharpening might not realize this concept.

    Once I get a new knife, my own bevels are set immediately starting at a 600 grit and working up in my progression. From this point on, stropping on leather and touching up on a 5K polishing stone is all you need as a home cook as far as maintenance is concerned for a good while...dropping down to 1200 or even back to the coarser 600 is only needed when: the edge isn't getting back to where I want it after strop/polishing stones, I want to thin the bevel shoulders a bit, or I want to regrind new bevels like the very first time.

  5. #25
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    Caddy, I'll keep that in mind!
    It's nuts how differently every steel responds to different stones. To be honest, my King stone is great on my Swedish steels, but the fact that some people will actually stop at 1-1.2k blows my mind!
    09/06

    Take a look around at: www.sharpandshinyshop.com

    Email me at: tmclean@sharpandshinyshop.com

  6. #26
    Senior Member Cadillac J's Avatar
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    For my honesuki and Global G-2 beater, a 1200 edge is perfect. I actually like to refine a bit at 5K, then drop down to the Bester to re-add some bite...I find that works really well.

  7. #27
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    I can see the 5k, then add some toothiness with some slight roughing up on a 1.2k. I'm assuming it's very light roughing up, though?
    I do something really similar with my stainless. I work up to 1500 wet/dry (wet), then use a dry piece for some bite. It's McMoney in a kitchen setting!
    With my carbons, however, I definitely like some polish, as they don't become "slippery" once refined on high grit.
    By the way, this thread is getting wicked. I hope everyone is drinking in the goodness!
    09/06

    Take a look around at: www.sharpandshinyshop.com

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  8. #28
    I'll throw in my two cents on my experience with the Takeda handheld 800/1200. Because the technique is to lay the blade flat against a piece of flat wood, then scrub the blade at the desired angle, I've gotten my best results with small blades and paring knives. Laying it flat against the wood adds rigidity, which gives me more control. I've restored some of my small knives to common use with it, where before they were just clutter. The handheld also lets me work on the tips of my larger knives where I am weakest in my sharpening skills. I can use the takeda to get very precise results.

    Cheers,

    Jack

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