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Thread: Laser VS Workhorse

  1. #1
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    Laser VS Workhorse

    Is there any task that a workhorse gyuto is able to perform, that would be difficult or impossible for a laser?

    Jay

  2. #2
    Senior Member Mucho Bocho's Avatar
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    Jay, If I may, Could we also get some numbers/measurements around what people consider "workhorse" or "Laser" Gyuto?

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    Senior Member TamanegiKin's Avatar
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    Biggest thing I notice is that a thinner knife wedges a lot more in things like potatoes.
    On the flip side if I'm cutting something super hard like kabocha or butternut my thinner knives go through with much less resistance.

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    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    Thinner knives can not have as much of a convexed or "s" ground face since there isn't as much material to work with. This can create more stiction to the blade face especially on taller blades. Certain cuts "walking the board" make me cringe while using a laser as well.
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  5. #5
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TamanegiKin View Post
    Biggest thing I notice is that a thinner knife wedges a lot more in things like potatoes.
    On the flip side if I'm cutting something super hard like kabocha or butternut my thinner knives go through with much less resistance.
    thinner knives, by definition, can't "wedge" as much as thicker knives, and your second sentence contradicts your first. what you are describing is sticktion, which is typically greater for the reasons ThEoRy gave.

  6. #6
    Senior Member TamanegiKin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EdipisReks View Post
    thinner knives, by definition, can't "wedge" as much as thicker knives, and your second sentence contradicts your first. what you are describing is sticktion, which is typically greater for the reasons ThEoRy gave.
    That is exactly what I was attempting to describe, thanks.

  7. #7
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    No prob. I love the Heiji geometry for things like potatoes, but I usually switch over to my Singatirin honyaki for rutabagas and hard squash, as you just can't get around the physics. well, that's not really true, i just use the Heijis and push harder, because I usually use one knife for an entire meal prep, but you know what I mean.

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    Would it be fair to say that a laser can perform the same tasks as a work horse? That is not to say there are differences in how the knives do their tasks. Some caution would have to be used, with the laser.

    Often times, when a search is being made for a knife, desirable qualities listed are: lightness and thinness, in other words a laser. After experiencing a laser, a number of users have posted their preference for a heavier knife. Why? What advantage is the added weight?

    Jay

  9. #9
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    I've owned a bunch of very thin knives. The only very thin knife I still own is a Konosuke White #2 300mm suji. It's very thin, and it's awesome for slicing roasts, and when I was in Florida in May, I found out that it's awesome for trimming scallops (made a ripert dish that blew my in-laws heads off). For general tasks, I'd rather have a heavier knife that has less stiction than a lighter, thinner knife. That's why I've bought three Heijis.

  10. #10
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    For anything that involves repetitive chopping motions, liking mincing or guillotine cuts I like a more robust knife. It feels like a thicker blade will absorb the force more. Thinner lasers for just about everything else. But that's just me. I'm sure plenty will disagree.

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