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Thread: Laser VS Workhorse

  1. #11
    Senior Member stevenStefano's Avatar
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    Sometimes a heavier knife is advantageous. I think cutting spring onions is one. You can have a very sharp knife but a little weight really helps cut cleanly. For heavier knives you can also often cut with a vertical up and down motion with no need to move forward and back as well because the weight of the knife takes away the need. They both have their advantages and disadvantages

  2. #12
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    It's also really difficult to decide what a laser is based on weight because the handle could account for a lot of the overall weight of the knife. Even spine thickness isn't necessarily a determining factor, because you have to consider how quickly the blade tapers from spine to heel. I've used knives before with 2.4-2.6mm spines that felt thicker, not laser like.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by labor of love View Post
    For anything that involves repetitive chopping motions, liking mincing or guillotine cuts I like a more robust knife. It feels like a thicker blade will absorb the force more. Thinner lasers for just about everything else. But that's just me. I'm sure plenty will disagree.
    I agree for many jobs in Gardemanger from slicing tomato's,lemon wedges,peeling fruits,to cutting Sushi I prefer a Lazor.Even slicing meats wt. out bone.

  4. #14
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    I'm not a pro, but I went from a workhorse (Mario knife) to a laser (White #2 Gesshin Ginga). I love the ease of cutting, lightness, balance of the Ginga. I also prefer the feedback of monosteel carbon steel vs. stainless and the handle. I don't baby it at all and I don't feel that I have to. (I also use a Japanese synthetic board that I feel takes really good care of edges.)

    I also felt less fatigue using this knife than other heavier knives (which as I use more knives, I think is result of better balance, not necessarily weight). But, that's just me.

    The one thing I wish it did have was better food release. But, it's a laser - you're likely not going to get great food release from a laser.
    Michael
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  5. #15
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    Mhlee, just carve some glestain dimples into the side of your ginga and it should be fine

  6. #16
    So at what point does a "Laser" become a "Workhorse"? Is there something in between? Or does it go from Laser to Workhorse?

    Sorry for the questions, as you can see by my posts, kinda new here

  7. #17

    stereo.pete's Avatar
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    I prefer the feel of my Devin ITK, Shig and Yoshikane compared to my Konosuke gyuto (laser). I can't quite explain it but I feel as if the knife is more solid and I have more confidence in using it. Granted I still enjoy the hell out of my Konosuke every time I use it. For me I guess it comes down to aesthetics.

    When I was much younger my Dad gave me his old set of Ping Zing 2 golf clubs. This was a serious set of irons for someone at the age of 12 and I used them for about 3 years before I purchased my first set of irons, Titleist DCI 981's. I immediately preferred the new irons based on the look of the club head, it seemed more natural to me and that gave me more confidence when standing over the ball. Golf is 80% mental for me, if I am not confident looking down at the club face and ball then chances are I will not swing true.

    Weird I know, but for me, looks have a big part of how something can perform for me. Don't get me wrong, the grind has to right otherwise a workhorse is just a big slab of steel.
    Twitter: @PeterDaEater

  8. #18
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    For me, the softer the object being cut, the more advantageous it is to use a thicker knife with more convexity. My Zakuri is almost like a double beveled yanagiba. Slices of meat or whatever just fall away from it. The other time a thicker knife is nice is for highly repetitive tasks where some downward force needs to be applied for whatever reason. It's more comfortable to apply that force on a nice wide (and appropriately eased) spine. What I think is odd is when people think their lasers are more delicate than their "workhorses" even though the reality of it is a Gengetsu is thinner near the edge than a Konosuke, etc. If there is a part of your blade that is going to get munched, it's the area right by the edge, unless you're using it like a crowbar.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by labor of love View Post
    Mhlee, just carve some glestain dimples into the side of your ginga and it should be fine
    Kind of like recommending I further thin my Ginga, right?

    Scary thing is, some people actually have recommended thinning a laser like a Sakai Yusuke or Ginga without ever having done such a thing.

    http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/sh...-Hiro-AS/page4
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  10. #20
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    ...or you could drill out some holes along the length of the blade.

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