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Thread: Electricians and Their Favorite Tools

  1. #1
    Senior Member Seth's Avatar
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    Electricians and Their Favorite Tools

    Well, if I could do it over, I would be an electrician. So if you are on this forum you are probably particular about your tools. I've been in buying mode. I have screwdrivers and pliers from Klein, Knipex, Wiha, Wera. All these brands seem to be pretty high-end. I like screwdrivers from Wera and pliers of various types from Knipex. The pliers from Wiha are nice too but have a different feel to them.

    What would be your favorites for various categories. Just curious about pros and the brands and tools they like. I will say that these tools do less damage to the finances than collecting Shigs....
    Seth
    Everywhere you go, there you are.

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    Senior Member bkultra's Avatar
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    Check out this site for more of the higher end brands. You named some very good brands but this site has a few more you left out (like NWS Germany).

    http://chadstoolbox.com

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    Senior Member Castalia's Avatar
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    That is a very cool site! I liked the Wera bottle opener.

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    I use a lot of Klein tools but I do like some others for specific task. I like Wera termination screw drivers for the small stuff. Grey tools make the best ratchet wrenches and I really like their adjustable wrenches. I just picked up a Wera multi driver with a ratcheting mechanism, I like it but it will not replace my Klein screw drives. Ridgid pipe wrenches are the only way to go.

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    A few more

    Ideal for fish tapes, hand pipe benders and wire strippers.
    Greenlee for hydraulic knockout punches, cable cutters, ratcheting and electric pipe benders and cable tuggers and tugging accessories.
    Fluke for meters all the way.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Lucretia's Avatar
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    +1 for Fluke meters

    Omega makes good temperature measurement equipment.

    If you just want to look for things that you've never heard of and didn't know you might need, Grainger (http://www.grainger.com) and McMaster Carr (http://www.mcmaster.com) are fun.
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    Oh nice, a thread where I am totally in my environment.

    Klein linesman pliers with the thinner insulation. I prefer the hardened ones with the crimper built in: http://www.kleintools.com/catalog/hi...ector-crimping

    For diagonal cutter or "dikes" I like the thicker insulation versions with the angled head which is useful for removing nails or staples etc.: http://www.kleintools.com/catalog/hi...rs-angled-head

    For needle nose thicker insulation again although I could not fine the thicker insulation ones, maybe they are not made anymore?: http://www.kleintools.com/catalog/he...s-side-cutting.

    For basic voltage testers I prefer one with a built in continuity tester since they are so often used. This one is the no brainer, if an electrician shows up at your house with another model, I would think they either have not been doing this for long or worse. I still have my first one, with the leads replaced several times. I bought it in 1986 http://www.idealind.com/ideal-electr...e-testers.aspx
    The digital version is not tough enough.

    I prefer Greenlee pipe benders,and Ideal fishsteels.

    I have two Fluke meters, an every day one: http://en-us.fluke.com/products/clam...amp-meter.html

    And a model that will store data: http://en-us.fluke.com/products/digi....html#features.

    I use Klein screwdrivers but am not in love with them, for smaller screwdrivers I order Wera.

    The king of hacksaws is by Greenlee, mine is about 20 years old. http://www.whitecap.com/shop/wc/gree...brand-Greenlee The new model sucks.

    Hilti is the best for drills. I have an older model (I sense a theme here). The chuck is removable so it takes either a true percussion SDS bit for concrete or a HS chuck for wood or metal this is the newest version of mine: https://www.us.hilti.com/drilling-%2...-hammers/r3509

    For drilling wood my go to drill is by Makita. It's quiet, a big benefit in my mind, and powerful enough. I like the 90 degree because it's easier to pull the wires thru : http://makitatools.com/en-us/Modules...?Name=DA4000LR

    My small cordless is by Panasonic, I used to use the Milwaukee but their tools have really gone down hill over the last 20 years or so. I think Panasonic cordless tools are the best, at least for now They charge quickly and the battery can drive a 1.5 inch screw flush into pine. I use it mostly for switch and plugging.: http://www.amazon.com/Panasonic-EY74.../dp/B000RERWXC

  8. #8

    ecchef's Avatar
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    Another vote for Fluke. I have an 87 III that's been indestructible.
    I also like my Bosch I driver, as long as I don't try to use it as a drill. However, the shank on Japanese bits is too long to allow the collet to lock, which is really friggin annoying.
    “Though I could not caution all, I still might warn a few; Don’t lend your hand to raise no flag atop no ship of fools.” Robert Hunter

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    Speaking of screwdrivers, I've mostly replaced my Wiha phillips heads for Hozan JIS head screwdrivers. They fit the screws in anything made in Asia better than regular phillips head drivers because a lot of cruciform type screws nowadays are actually JIS head screws and not phillips. They are also compatible with phillips screws.

    I love my Fluke 179. If you are dealing with higher voltages, I would not trust any no name Made in China meter. Check out some of the videos where they subject different meters to high voltages. Positively hair raising.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Dardeau's Avatar
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    That is interesting. I've noticed the Asian Phillips problem, good to know its not just me.

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