Quantcast
Newbie needs some help - going to Japan - Page 3
Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 47

Thread: Newbie needs some help - going to Japan

  1. #21
    Well in that case, the threadstarter is better off using the net, than get hustled at a knifestore made for tourists.
    I guess this will be the perfect knife: http://www.This Site Not Allowed Here.com.com/todpwa24.html

    Or he could even have DrNaka get him a Yoshikane or a Shigefusa for far less than he would have payed on a marked in Japan
    If he wants to impress friends then he should at least know what he is buying. Because its rather embarrasing going to Italy to buy a car to show all your friends and familiy and telling them all sorts of stories about this Italian muscle car made by experts with a long list of customer waiting for their special car, and its this one you bought: http://drpinna.com/wp-content/upload...x-Fiat_500.jpg and your friend actually thought you bought this one: http://www.exoticcars.ws/cars/ferrar...doors-open.jpg

    but I admit, there are cool history among cheap knives as well: http://www.This Site Not Welcome Here.com.com/mm5/m...y_Code=BOMBCUT
    But the threadstarter wants to get into things before he buys. Lets inform him about the possibilities

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by oivind_dahle View Post
    If he wants to impress friends then he should at least know what he is buying.
    I believe most of us buy knives we like to help us cook at home or professionally. Impressing friends is not that important, as most do not care about kitchen knives. Even in a professional kitchen some people do not care. You should not buy knives to impress people, or recommend that is what other should do.

    If you went to japan on vacation and bought a Masamoto or a Takeda or a Konosuke or whatever, you would come home with a great knife AND a cool story behind it. The knives we discuss here are better than 99.9% of the kitchen cutlery out there. You will not end up with a "bad" knife no matter which of our recommendations you go with. Custom knives are great, but like the top 0.1% of anything, their cost is much higher than their added performance. Does the Ferrari get you to work any faster than the Fiat? Probably not. If so, not much.

    NOT EVERYONE CAN AFFORD OR NEEDS CUSTOMS. You need to stop recommending them to everyone, and talking poorly about "mass-produced" knives. It's not like we are talking about stamped Chicago Cutlery here with molded plastic handles. And if everyone had customs, yours wouldnt be special, and what would you do then?
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  3. #23
    Senior Member

    SpikeC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    PDX
    Posts
    3,773
    I don't have the kind of experience with a variety of makers like others on this list do, but after a lot of looking and study I bought a Takeda 210 gyuto as my first Jknife, and I am in love with it. It has obvious marks of hand craftsmanship, a properly patinaed cladding and an amazing core steel. And it just feels so natural in my hand, a true extension of it.
    I would recommend at least checking them out.
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  4. #24
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    4,227
    Your budget is more than adequate to get awesome performing knives that look nice, too. If I were you, I would go to Japan Woodworker across the bay and hold some knives with your hands and/or talk to Jon Broida (or better yet go for a visit). Look at the thinness the last two inches from the tip and note the thinness the last cm behind the edge. Even if the steel is mediocre (which it won't be), blades that are thin in these areas will cut like crazy. Aside from that, make sure it's comfortable wherever your hand makes contact with the knife/handle and you're pretty much set. If you have to do it blind, I'd go with KonHD 240 (gyuto or suji) with an upgraded handle and pretty much any 150mm petty made out of stainless or semi-stainless. I've decided I'm not going to recommend A-types anymore. It is true they are wear-resistant and take an awesome edge but the steel is too soft (hrc 58 ish), imo. The edge deforms too easily for the way I use my knives.

  5. #25
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Pensacola, FL, USA
    Posts
    3,897
    Lars,

    Sorry to have to tell you that research will only take you so far in the process of selecting a knife. There is a strong personal component involved that seems to defy quantification. I say this not to discourage you, but to forewarn you that the knife that meets all of the criteria you have set down on paper may not prove to be the knife you expect it to be once you actually use it. To put it in IT terms, think of NetBeans vs Eclipse. Both are good Java IDEs, but personal preference plays a big part in which one you favor, and you can't tell without using them.

    For this reason, I would advise you against buying all three of the knives you mention while in Japan. I would suggest instead that you buy one knife as a souvenir of your trip, but one that might happen to be useful in the kitchen. Brands to look for are Aritsugu, Monzaburo and Masamoto.

    You should understand that the traditional Japanese knife styles (usuba, deba, kiritsuke, yanagiba/takobiki) were designed for the techniques of preparing traditional Japanese cuisine. They are far less suited for the tasks of a Western kitchen, and you will find using them for that purpose can be a frustrating experience.

    For example, the yanagiba excels in producing thin slices of raw fish, but is hardly the tool of choice for carving a turkey or slicing a roast. The usuba is an excellent tool for katsuramuki, but does not perform as well in dicing onions or slicing tomatoes as a Western chef's knife. Unless you are planning a complete change of your cuisine from Western to Eastern, put aside the notion of getting a set of traditional Japanese knives to use in your Western kitchen.

    What I think you need to outfit a Western kitchen is the Japanese equivalent of Western knife styles. The gyuto is the rough equivalent of a chef's knife; the sujihiki is the equivalent of a slicing or carving knife; the petty, or petit gyuto, is a long paring knife. The nakiri is unique, in that there is no Western counterpart, but it is an excellent vegetable knife.

    From your original post, a nakiri or gyuto, a petty, and a sujihiki would serve you well. You may want to ask Jon Broida of Japanese Knife Imports to suggest some choices. You are close enough to LA to consider a trip there to see the knives in person.

    Good luck, and have a great vacation.

    Rick

  6. #26
    Senior Member

    SpikeC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    PDX
    Posts
    3,773
    Excellent advice, Rick.
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  7. #27
    i'd be happy to speak with you about knives in Japan... shoot me a PM or e-mail if you're interested

  8. #28
    Senior Member Cadillac J's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Detroit
    Posts
    621
    Quote Originally Posted by oivind_dahle View Post
    If he wants to impress friends then he should at least know what he is buying. Because its rather embarrasing going to Italy to buy a car to show all your friends and familiy and telling them all sorts of stories about this Italian muscle car made by experts with a long list of customer waiting for their special car, and its this one you bought.
    Who buys knives to impress their friends?

    If I can sharpen and cut better with my 'cheap, mass-produced' Konosukes...how does that make them inferior to your customs for their intended purpose?

    Also, in your car example: What I think would be more embarrassing would be someone buying a genuine Ferrari Enzo just for how people perceive them, but not having the skills to drive or maintain it properly. If someone could take a Corvette Z06 (cheap and mass produced in comparison) and tune it to be faster, better handling and they were able to drive circles around you...then would you still try to knock them down a peg because your vehicle costs much more?

    I'm not trying to rag on you, as you are entitled to your opinions. But for you to continually criticize the majority of knives we discuss here (especially to newbs), all because you are on some high-horse with your customs, is asinine and makes you come off as extremely pretentious.

  9. #29
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    4,227
    Quote Originally Posted by Cadillac J View Post
    ...But for you to continually criticize the majority of knives we discuss here (especially to newbs), all because you are on some high-horse with your customs, is asinine and makes you come off as extremely pretentious.
    CJ, haven't you read OD's favorite quote? The one about being "insensitive?" Also, he does love the HiroAS which is a mass produced knife. So... Basically, he's knuts. I'm sure the OP can figure that out.

  10. #30
    If you really believe what your are writing - how come a Kramer goes for 20 000 USD on ebay?
    The best part is that they will most likely never be used. Damn people must be dumb!

    Nah, you see a lot of customers out there want the best of the best, even though they cant handle the knife like it should. I honestly think most users here are far more skilled with the knife compared to me, I also believe most people here are better sharpeners than me. But so what? For me knives is a hobby, and its a rather cheap hobby as well. I used to be into hifi, photo and computers. That was a far more expensive hobbies than collecting a few knives....

    Most Norwegian chefs I know (and some of them have won really high medals internationally) dont have a japanese knife, and even use a dull knife for cutting. But their food is awesome, so perhaps a knife in the long run dont matter at all? Victorinox is the brand top chefs in Norway uses.

    What Im saying is that customers are not only interested in how the knife preforms and how sharp it will get. A lot of buyers are into history, the craftmanship and the true beauty of the knife. And if you go to Japan, you should know a little about knives or you are better off using the web or visiting your local store and try some out. But we have different standards you and me. If someone ask for a beautiful lady I would recommend Megan Fox, you on the other hand would recommend Rosanne Barr. Both would give you an orgasm, but one of them you wouldnt brag about to your friends

    I will continue to recommend the top makers, and they may not make a far more better knife than a japanese brand like konosuke. But thats not the point. Someone wants a little special in the kitchen - and a massproduced knife is not that special... Why would anybody buy a Custom of Devin, if all they needed was a ITK? :S

    Its time to realize that knives are not only tools, but to a lot of customers its something more....

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •