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Thread: Just wanted to share Some Food pics and knife action shots from My last restaurant.

  1. #11

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    Really nice work! How do you cook your gobo for puree?
    Though I could not caution all I still might warn a few; Don't raise your hand to raise no flag atop no ship of fools. - Robert Hunter

  2. #12
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    I was under the impression all Tasmanian Salmon was pond raised.

    We get some Wild Caught Tasmanian Salmon/Ocean Trout from one of our suppliers flown in when in season... They tell me its tasmanian salmon but seems to be more in line with tasmanian ocean trout based on my experience in the past. Similar Size, Shape and Color of the Flesh. The Flavor is very clean and not as oily/rich as typical salmon another reason that led me to believe it may truly be ocean trout. Possibly just so its easier to upsell to their clients they say salmon. Salmon is a known commodity while ocean trout is relatively unknown to the local market here. Best of what i have found locally. Wish i could get some King or Copper River Salmon from Alaska that would be awesome but no luck trying to get an importer to bring some in for me.

    The rest of the time we get farmed tasmanian salmon (a bit larger than the trout) although they are farmed in pens in the middle of the ocean in the southern waters of Australia i believe. I looked up the company info my purveyor provided. Good practice and very sustainable operation. So far its been Better than any farm raised salmon i have ever dealt with. Good fat content but very balanced unlike some of the mass produced farmed salmon out there. We get them flash frozen whole head on but gutted. Still has the slime on the skin when you thaw it out pretty good sign of quality. Most fish start to lose the mucus like slime on their bodies even just a day out of the water. So these are harvested in the ocean gutted and sent through a flash freezing cycle. We tried fresh flown in weekly but the whole frozen ones were so much better and more consistent. Never thought i would ever say that but you live and learn.

  3. #13
    Very cool photography and labour intensive presentation. Awesome.
    Thanks for sharring

  4. #14
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    Wow! What's the restaurant? I'll have to pay you a visit next time I'm in Manila.
    This was from my first venture here. we opened outside of the the main center, in the suburb where my home was located. We're in the process of relocating and my new restaurant is under construction, will be in Makati. Dont have a name yet for the new place drawing a blank trying to think of one. Will post some pics of the restaurant and more food when were up an running in a couple of weeks.

  5. #15
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    How do you cook your gobo for puree?
    We peel the root and let it soak in acidulated water(if u are looking for a light colored puree). Using lemon or citrus is better than using distilled vinegar but both will work. For this dish i season with yuzu juice before plating so the citrus flavor stays bright.


    For a more neutral flavor ascorbic acid works really well if u have it available or stems of parsley has enough vitamin c to prevent oxidation. This way any citrusy/vinegary flavor from the soak doesnt affect the final product. With the parsley stems its trial and error to know how much you need in the water. We cut it sasagaki style(like sharpening a pencil with a knife) and cook them sousvide with the tiniest amount of butter. Cant remember the temp that i do with these its something like 167f for 8-12 hours. You can puree them straight out of the bag and season the puree with salt. Run it through a chinois twice and season with citrus before serving. The citrus gives a good brightness that work with the earthiness of the gobo. Complements fatty and rich proteins well. The puree will never truly be super smooth like is achievable with other root veg, just the nature of gobo but its also not starchy at all. We only use a little to balance out the flavors on the dish.

    An alternative if looking for a darker puree with a smokier/roasted gobo flavor. we peel the root and roast it in the oven for a few minutes to get some browning. We then let it cool and it will start oxidizing, then we do the same process, cut sasagaki then sousvide but this time with brown butter. I ussually do it this way to serve it with fish like grouper or snapper. The darker color goes well with the white flesh of the fish and the roasted erathy flavor is a good comlement.

    Also the better the gobo you can get the better the results, ussually japanese varieties are the best, i have tried some from taiwan and korea and they are pretty good as well. The gobo from china is 2 woodsy and fibrous. Look for about 1/2 inch to 3/4 inch diameter roots, the flesh should be firm but the root itself flexible( it will bends along the length of the root ) if the root's flesh is mushy/soft to the touch then its old, if it seems to be cracking and very firm or brittle ussually they were harvested too late and are too mature to yield anything good.

    Hope this helps

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by ms4awd View Post
    We get some Wild Caught Tasmanian Salmon/Ocean Trout from one of our suppliers flown in when in season... They tell me its tasmanian salmon but seems to be more in line with tasmanian ocean trout based on my experience in the past. Similar Size, Shape and Color of the Flesh. The Flavor is very clean and not as oily/rich as typical salmon another reason that led me to believe it may truly be ocean trout. Possibly just so its easier to upsell to their clients they say salmon. Salmon is a known commodity while ocean trout is relatively unknown to the local market here. Best of what i have found locally. Wish i could get some King or Copper River Salmon from Alaska that would be awesome but no luck trying to get an importer to bring some in for me.

    The rest of the time we get farmed tasmanian salmon (a bit larger than the trout) although they are farmed in pens in the middle of the ocean in the southern waters of Australia i believe. I looked up the company info my purveyor provided. Good practice and very sustainable operation. So far its been Better than any farm raised salmon i have ever dealt with. Good fat content but very balanced unlike some of the mass produced farmed salmon out there. We get them flash frozen whole head on but gutted. Still has the slime on the skin when you thaw it out pretty good sign of quality. Most fish start to lose the mucus like slime on their bodies even just a day out of the water. So these are harvested in the ocean gutted and sent through a flash freezing cycle. We tried fresh flown in weekly but the whole frozen ones were so much better and more consistent. Never thought i would ever say that but you live and learn.
    I've not heard of wild caught Tasmanian Salmon, but that doesn't mean it's not available. I think the best tassy stuff is from Maquarie Harbour. The Franklin river flows into the Harbour with such force, the top 2 metres of the Harbour are fresh water. This means the fish are constantly in salt & fresh water, which helps kill parasites that live in each. This is what I have been led to believe anyway.

    Good looks great also
    Huw
    In order to make delicious food, you must eat delicious food. Jiro Ono

  7. #17
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    Thanks for the kind words everyone


    Hi Huw

    I wouldnt be surprised if they were ranched and i was told they were wild caught by the purveyor to justify the price.... I ended up using it when it was available cause it was the best we could get down here... I still believe its ocean trout but i cant complain its good quality... reminds me a bit of arctic char when cooked well.. I try to offer more local line caught fish but it can be a tougher sell down here sometimes...

  8. #18
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    For the gobo puree, i forgot put a bit of stock with the bag before sous vide, helps it cook evenly, and use the liquid fron the bag when pureeing add more stock to adjust cinsistency

    On another note if u do try this mustard works well with the puree also

  9. #19
    I prefer ocean trout to salmon, But its getting harder for me to get, I think the majority is going overseas now.
    Huw
    In order to make delicious food, you must eat delicious food. Jiro Ono

  10. #20
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    I think the best tassy stuff is from Maquarie Harbour. The Franklin river flows into the Harbour with such force, the top 2 metres of the Harbour are fresh water. This means the fish are constantly in salt & fresh water, which helps kill parasites that live in each. This is what I have been led to believe anyway.
    will have to ask about that, maybe my purveyor can source it for us... Thanks for the info

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