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Thread: Stone Correcting

  1. #11
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    +1 to Dusty and franz. Diamond plates are nice but not necessary for kitchen knives. I don't like stone fixers though. They are expensive cinder blocks.

  2. #12
    Senior Member smilesenpai's Avatar
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    Oh okay. Now to reply in order.
    franzb69. Using a wall to flatter stones. I see a laughable image of you doing in a public place and getting strange looks. Ha ha!

    Zwiefel. What grit is the brown stone suitable for?

    zitangy. I am a bit of a nut so when I begin to notice dishing, I want to correct my stone.

    "Hard or soft"?.. My first stone, so I don't know. It is a Shun stone. The 1k side I think is very soft compared to the 6k.

    Are the cheap stones do you use?

    "Mud bath polish". Does this mean you have a water bath and take edges off in the water using your diamond plate?

    Using a nagura seem so complex. A small stone to correct one at least 5 times the size sound nuts.

    http://toolsforworkingwood.com/store/blog/91
    The site above agrees with you combination of grit method.

    Collecting slurry. You are hard core! So far my is in the garden. :P

    tk59. In Australia we call cinder blocks "besser blocks". Crazy world. I thought they would be too rough as the once I have dealt with have small stone (1mm) in them. Do you just find a soon one?

    Thank for your input. I was getting so confused reading all these "info sites" and "youtube pros".

  3. #13

    Zwiefel's Avatar
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    I used my fixer on all of my stones.

    Nagura isnt really for correcting stones. Its for smoothing out deeper scratches from correcting and for building slurry. JKI has a video discussing this on youtube....i cant copy/paste links from this device , so youll have to do some digging on Jons channel....time well spent though


    Quote Originally Posted by smilesenpai View Post
    Oh okay. Now to reply in order.
    franzb69. Using a wall to flatter stones. I see a laughable image of you doing in a public place and getting strange looks. Ha ha!

    Zwiefel. What grit is the brown stone suitable for?

    zitangy. I am a bit of a nut so when I begin to notice dishing, I want to correct my stone.

    "Hard or soft"?.. My first stone, so I don't know. It is a Shun stone. The 1k side I think is very soft compared to the 6k.

    Are the cheap stones do you use?

    "Mud bath polish". Does this mean you have a water bath and take edges off in the water using your diamond plate?

    Using a nagura seem so complex. A small stone to correct one at least 5 times the size sound nuts.

    http://toolsforworkingwood.com/store/blog/91
    The site above agrees with you combination of grit method.

    Collecting slurry. You are hard core! So far my is in the garden. :P

    tk59. In Australia we call cinder blocks "besser blocks". Crazy world. I thought they would be too rough as the once I have dealt with have small stone (1mm) in them. Do you just find a soon one?

    Thank for your input. I was getting so confused reading all these "info sites" and "youtube pros".
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

  4. #14
    Senior Member Justin0505's Avatar
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    I think that some people really get excessive when it comes flattening their stones. You really don't need a perfectly flat stone for the majority of the knives that you sharpen. If you're working a big, flat profiled single bevel, then it matters a little more. Coarse sandpaper on a flat surface works fine and I've also heard of people using that mesh abrasive thats made for smoothing plaster patches on drywall. However, once you get them flat, you should be able to keep them that way just by keeping an eye on it and adjusting what part of the stone you're using when sharpening.
    Useful infor starts around 1:30 :
    "I gotta tell ya, this is pretty terrific. Ha hahaha, YEAH!" - Moe (w/ 2 knives). http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YVt4U...layer_embedded

  5. #15
    Senior Member smilesenpai's Avatar
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    Wah! I have been away for a while.

    I found a big granite tile for flattening. Seems to work great!

    Have you guys seen how the dudes on Chef Steps sharpen their knives? Single stroke for the whole blade on a stone. What is your thoughts?

  6. #16
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    I have used the shun 1K-6K stone.It will do the job,a little small but good combo of grits.I used fixers before learning of diamond plates.To me even a cheap 140 plate 29.00 works better than the fixers.As mentioned stones get dished & high on the ends.Using an X pattern on the ends levels faster.Also good to bevel your stones,never want high edges.

    Also esp. wt. a small stone like the Shun don't go crazy over kill in flattening or you will not have much stone left.As said perfect flat is not ness. unless doing Japan Single Bevels.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Matus's Avatar
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    I have used both Naniwa flattening stone (220 grit) and a large piece of sandpaper on a tile floor (bit messy ;-) ) to flatten a rather soft 1k stone and can just say that I found the sandpaper to work better and faster. The flattening stone (looks like the first one in the link posted above) is smaller than the stone you will flatten and if you hand slips in the process, it may chip the edge of the stone (It did several times on mine, but this may just be poor quality of my current sharpening stone).

    So - just get enough rough sandpaper and a large tile if the flattening diamond plates are beyond the budget. Just my opinion. It will help if you can tape the sandpaper to the tile as it will avoid folding of the sandpaper. As you proabably found out already - the sandpaper may clog rather fast.

  8. #18
    I use piece of glass and drywall screen 120 or 240 grit on top. Works quite well and on sheet lasts a while.
    I use wet piece of cotton sheet on the bottom of the glass to prevent slippage and one sheet on top of the glass to have nicer feel. Cheap and dandy

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by smilesenpai View Post

    Have you guys seen how the dudes on Chef Steps sharpen their knives? Single stroke for the whole blade on a stone. What is your thoughts?
    Different strokes for different folks. There is no "right" way to sharpen.
    “Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pensacola Tiger View Post
    Different strokes for different folks. There is no "right" way to sharpen.
    Yes there are alot of ways to get a sharp knife,but when I learned Japan style wt. fingerpads close to the edge,I never had to worry about dull blades anymore period.

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