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Thread: Polished vs. toothy edges

  1. #11
    Senior Member zitangy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dannynyc View Post
    Now THAT makes sense.

    This is one of the reasons that i reckon that it will be better not to overpolish with each grit and leave multiple grit striations on an edge..

    The courser grit will leave a higher striation will be hte first to go (?) as it is higher and more direct contact with teh food and then the finer grit striation will be the next to go and the finest grit being the smallest striations will be the last line of defence. UNless, the coarser striations folds over the finer striation and render it toothless.

    Logically say if it is over polished on say the 10,000 grit, the edge can be taken finer/thinner as the stone is finer provided of course that the steel is also fine grained and will thus roll/ fold over quicker than the thicker edge from a not so fine stone.

    Havent figured out why courser grit will be better for push cut. Has it got anything to do with the angle of the striations/ teeth in relation to the edge? CLd it be that most people sharpen the knives to stone at 60 degrees ( there about) as it is an instinctive angle as it is more comfortable and natural?

    just my thoughts..
    d

  2. #12
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    Murry Carter talks about striation direction in his Advanced Sharpening DVD.Japanese Sushi Chefs are said to sharpen at a angle usually polishing stones to give a striation that favors the slicing action of a Yanagi cut.He also talks of the theory of a master Japanese sharpener that leaving some mud on the stone not only aids in sharpening process,but also causes abrasion in all different directions that adds durability to the edge.

  3. #13
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    With natural stones grit range varies and changes when it further refines in the mud. This causes teeth of many different sizes which abrade at different rates causing the edge to last longer.
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  4. #14
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    Gyuto, aim for that fine line between toothy and polished, a balanced edge. I find my latest stone very capable in that department
    JNS synthetic aoto, I have no idea what grit it is but I sharpen on it starting with moderate pressure and finish with light touches. Jks 3k stone works in this manner as well, I imagine the two stones I mentioned are around final 4k edge.

  5. #15
    Senior Member Justin0505's Avatar
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    as zitangy already mentioned: I've found that you can get a good combination of the benefits of toothy and polished by moving up the progression in stones before completely removing the scratches (teeth) from the coarser stone. Funny that you can get a "better" edge by using fewer stones, bigger gaps in grit, and spending less time on the later ones.
    "I gotta tell ya, this is pretty terrific. Ha hahaha, YEAH!" - Moe (w/ 2 knives). http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YVt4U...layer_embedded

  6. #16
    Senior Member andre s's Avatar
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    On certain knives (gyutos in particular come to mind), different parts along the edge tend serve different functions. I wonder if there would be any benefit to varying the level of polish/toothiness along the length (e.g. tip vs heel). Realizing that this would probably go against most proper (full stroke) sharpening techniques, I wonder if anybody here has experimented with that?

  7. #17
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    varying edge along the length of the blade would drive me nuts!!

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Justin0505 View Post
    as zitangy already mentioned: I've found that you can get a good combination of the benefits of toothy and polished by moving up the progression in stones before completely removing the scratches (teeth) from the coarser stone. Funny that you can get a "better" edge by using fewer stones, bigger gaps in grit, and spending less time on the later ones.
    +1. With regard to sharpening different parts of a knife different ways, some people do it, esp. if a knife is task specific and the task has two distinct parts. Deba sharpening comes to mind.

  9. #19

    Zwiefel's Avatar
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    Happy 4000th post TK59!
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  10. #20
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    I've been saying all along; since 10, 12, 16 and 32k stones were the fad; since .0025 micron strops;

    A rugged, well rounded gyuto edge lies between 2 and 6k tops. Anything above is just silly, "let me push cut this tomato one time" antics.

    I'm glad people are coming to there senses.

    I must say, I've always been very conscience about well aligned scratch patterns; this whole different patterns leads to more toughness thing is gonna have to be tested...
    The difference between try and triumph is a little "umph"! NO EXCUSES!!!!!!!
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