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Thread: Polished vs. toothy edges

  1. #31
    Senior Member Chefdog's Avatar
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    Bamin,
    What some do to kind of bridge the gap between toothy and polished is to drop down one stone (say from 8K to 2-3k) after polishing and strop a couple times on the coarser stone to add some bite to the edge.

  2. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by bamin View Post
    Never tried this, but what if you sharpen to a very polished edge and then put a micro-bevel on with a coarse stone? Would that have any kind of benefit or make a difference?
    Quote Originally Posted by JBroida View Post
    not really... its the same as sharpening on a coarse stone in general
    Makes some sense. The blade has been thinned down, and the edge appears very polished, but instead of stopping there a fine micro-bev has been put on with a lower-grit stone. Doesn't affect the appearance of the blade and thickness, but adds some longevity and gives some teeth.

  3. #33
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    i guess the only benefit is aesthetic... i was thinking in terms of performance. You could get the same results without going through all of that work.

  4. #34
    Senior Member zitangy's Avatar
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    Originally Posted by bamin
    Never tried this, but what if you sharpen to a very polished edge and then put a micro-bevel on with a coarse stone? Would that have any kind of benefit or make a difference?

    Originally Posted by JBroida
    not really... its the same as sharpening on a coarse stone in general
    Makes some sense. The blade has been thinned down, and the edge appears very polished, but instead of stopping there a fine micro-bev has been put on with a lower-grit stone. Doesn't affect the appearance of the blade and thickness, but adds some longevity and gives some teeth.

    Quote Originally Posted by JBroida View Post
    i guess the only benefit is aesthetic... i was thinking in terms of performance. You could get the same results without going through all of that work.
    Hmnn... thinking aloud..

    1) in between the striations wld be a finer/ striation (polished edge.) and the striation of the rougher stone will be first to go? Also if the higher striations just folds over the smaller striations will render the smaller striations useless in terms of bite function.


    2) The final edge polish will be the last stone/ honing rod grit that touched the edge unless it is done at a lower angle with teh edge not touching the stone.


    3) Jnats seems to be "unpure" with the diff materials giving diff grit size adn with its proclivity to be friable ( easily breaking down) we might as well "contaminate" our water stone by rubbing 2-3 water stone grits or just add a lump of assorted collected mud.

    thus if contamination is good on Jnats, must also be good on synthetic water stone?

    4) polishing with stone.. as Maxim mentioned.. the "texture" , watery or sticky or just the right amout of water wld make a difference and of course the pressure. My Naniwa stones gives a very light hazy "mist" not dark enough. I have not attained a respectable level at polishing at all. BUt can do a decent job with 600grit 3M sandpaper together with a blob of mud.

    rgds
    d

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by zitangy View Post
    Originally Posted by bamin
    Never tried this, but what if you sharpen to a very polished edge and then put a micro-bevel on with a coarse stone? Would that have any kind of benefit or make a difference?

    Originally Posted by JBroida
    not really... its the same as sharpening on a coarse stone in general
    Makes some sense. The blade has been thinned down, and the edge appears very polished, but instead of stopping there a fine micro-bev has been put on with a lower-grit stone. Doesn't affect the appearance of the blade and thickness, but adds some longevity and gives some teeth.



    Hmnn... thinking aloud..

    1) in between the striations wld be a finer/ striation (polished edge.) and the striation of the rougher stone will be first to go? Also if the higher striations just folds over the smaller striations will render the smaller striations useless in terms of bite function.


    2) The final edge polish will be the last stone/ honing rod grit that touched the edge unless it is done at a lower angle with teh edge not touching the stone.


    3) Jnats seems to be "unpure" with the diff materials giving diff grit size adn with its proclivity to be friable ( easily breaking down) we might as well "contaminate" our water stone by rubbing 2-3 water stone grits or just add a lump of assorted collected mud.

    thus if contamination is good on Jnats, must also be good on synthetic water stone?

    4) polishing with stone.. as Maxim mentioned.. the "texture" , watery or sticky or just the right amout of water wld make a difference and of course the pressure. My Naniwa stones gives a very light hazy "mist" not dark enough. I have not attained a respectable level at polishing at all. BUt can do a decent job with 600grit 3M sandpaper together with a blob of mud.

    rgds
    d
    quick notes...
    1. this is at a point that doesnt really yield tangible results
    2. yes
    3. synthetic abrasives are not friable and will not act in the same way as a natural stone even with grit contamination... the results are interesting, but not the same as a natural stone.

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