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Thread: "Sous Vide on the Cheap" (using a beer cooler)

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by labor of love View Post
    you dont want to know
    Its the same as black and blue isnt it?

  2. #12
    Senior Member Brad Gibson's Avatar
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    So, the steel workers in Pittsburg would bring raw steaks with them to work. They would sear it on their metal working stuff... I don't know the names of it. And char the steak but it would still be raw.

    Pittsburg style is just charred on the outside and rare as can be on the inside. Or yes you can call it black and blue.
    "A recipe has no soul. You as the cook must bring soul to the recipe." -Thomas Keller

  3. #13
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    i love sous vide meat cooking. i have been working with it since my early learning in various famous restaurants in paris. the results are astonishing if you can control temperature and if you proceed good.

    the only goal for me in this type of heating process is to keep the temperature regular across all the product to make protein change state slowly, keeping all (well... most of) water naturally present in the product (less weight loss, better texture), and forcing flavours in (you can use a non salted glace or "get coloured" the meat to force the taste). Also, sous vide gives total control on stopping a thing from continuing cooking, being somehow at the limits all the time.



    a steak should be doable if you heat it around 50°c to 60° regularly, and then, without letting him cool down, make a crust in some hot butter or other grease (and use salt at this point only) just before serving it.

    i've been myself head barman (as restaurants complex manager i had to learn what i didn't know) in brussels for a while. beer coolers water bath move in temperature in function of the charge (the more beer you serve within a limited time, the more hot it gets, and at a certain point beer too) making the temperature impossible to control, unless you want to drink al lot of beer . the water there is also contaminated and not food friendly, so you should avoid the contact with food (even in closed sous vide bags) because except if you wash them carefully with some bactericide, crap around the bag is gonna touch inside by the tool you open it with. i wouldn't either.

    sous vide is a nice mean to control the uniformity of the heat treatment, no point if you have no control on heat.

    Mucho Bocho, what a nice mastery of sous vided meat!!! i just dined, but i'm willing to eat that too, just how i like meat

    sorry if if i m hard to understand, english is not my native language and i've never worked in english speaking country so i lack technical terms in english :s

    PS:i understand pittsburg style is black (brown i hope) and blue (i love that) but has it to be warm on the inside like french "bleu" meat cooking?

  4. #14
    Senior Member AFKitchenknivesguy's Avatar
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    3200 welcome!
    Jason

  5. #15
    Senior Member Duckfat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by scotchef38 View Post
    Its the same as black and blue isnt it?
    Exactly the same.
    3200 Pittsburgh Rare is not brown on the exterior. It's charred.
    I wouldn't Sous Vide my steak but some cuts of beef might benefit from it. I don't think there are many (if any) steak houses are using Sous Vide aside from a few select items. It's just impractical on a broad spectrum.
    Jason Salamanders are for melting cheese or other light tasks. Steak Houses use swing broilers or Char Grills. Sous Vide should not have any effect on waste. There's nothing difficult about cooking steak. Having two double stack swing broilers rocking is a challenge but nothing a skilled cook can't master.

    Dave
    Who you jivin' with that Cosmik Debris?

  6. #16
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    thank you for explaining.

    i don't understand why a meat could be charred. in my opinion, black is burnt. as soon as you can taste the bitterness its over. we say ferré in french.
    without sous vide, colorating a steak to create a nice crust on both sides is pretty easy, the mostly unknown part is to have a tempered meat before cooking, to make protein state change most regularly, and to leave it under an aluminium sheet in a warm place (about 30 to 50°c) for the 1 to 3 minutes it has been heated. then the blood spreads across the piece of meat and the cooking stops slowly as the heat comes down and i guess this is my two cents in achieving a satisfing texture.

    the picture of mucho bocho's sous vide meat are a good example. the colour is regular across the meat, and a nice crust is present everywhere on the outside.

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