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Thread: Single bevel gyuto

  1. #51
    Senior Member Chef Doom's Avatar
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    Jon, I think you should have a special project to have a true single bevel gyuto made, then do a pass around on the forum, then there will be a general understanding of how ridiculous the whole concept is, and no one will bring up the idea again. First hand experience is key.

    Naturally you will have to eat the cost, consider it an early Xmas gift to the forum. If you need help I have $5 to spare. I just got paid yesterday.
    "Into a country where the jails are full, and the mad houses closed." - Charles Bukowski

  2. #52
    Senior Member Brad Gibson's Avatar
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    Lol!!! That suisin single bevel gyuto that PT sold on b/s/t recently doesn't seem that absurd. It actually looks pretty awesome. The major thing for me is; does it just look super awesome, or can it perform well also? If it is as sharp as I think it can be, you could keep a toothy edge on it and achieve a more sharp edge than a 50/50. If it doesn't steer itself all over the board and lose its edge in minutes I think it could be of great value in a pro kitchen.
    "A recipe has no soul. You as the cook must bring soul to the recipe." -Thomas Keller

  3. #53
    The suisin momiji funayuki is not a gyuto... its a type of deba used specifically for saba, aji, and the like. In most areas in japan, that is what funayuki is. The only exception is in rural areas, they sometimes make them double bevel, but they are still deba-like knives. Only in the US is funayuki a type of gyuto.

  4. #54
    Quote Originally Posted by eshua View Post
    No single bevel grind, no to sharpening 99% / 1% on the primary edge, or or both?
    Single bevel gyutos in general dont make sense... the grind makes much less sense than a highly asymmetric edge, but neither is a good idea.

  5. #55
    Senior Member Brad Gibson's Avatar
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    Jon hates this thread, I'm just gonna stop with it. Happy birthday Jon lol
    "A recipe has no soul. You as the cook must bring soul to the recipe." -Thomas Keller

  6. #56
    lol...actually, its an important thread... a lot of people misunderstand these things, so i'm glad we're talking about them

  7. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBroida View Post
    Single bevel gyutos in general dont make sense... the grind makes much less sense than a highly asymmetric edge, but neither is a good idea.
    Interesting I thin assem. gyuto's shallow angle close to the stone on both sides.Been doing your higher final bevel just on the cutting side,removing burr on backside.It is not a single bevel,but if you do this every time major sharpening the knife it takes on a more assem. flavor.I have done this to a couple of my J-Gyuto & they cut very well to me anyway.I have known Japanese National cooks here that sharpen their Gyuto's just on the cutting side.

  8. #58
    asymmetrical is not bad, but double bevel knives are not designed to be sharpened to 90/10 or 99/1 asymmetries. Also, keep in mind that even if chefs do this (and even if they are japanese), many of them have their knives fixed by professional sharpeners who do not do this. I used to sharpen this way also, until i went to japan and started learning under chefs, but more importantly, professional sharpeners there. Not one person that i've trained under in japan sharpens double bevel knives that way. Moreover, not one professional sharpener in Japan that i've talked to (and i know quite a few) think this is a good idea (and i've asked all of them).

  9. #59
    Single beveled gyuto, or suji or any western knife doesn't make much sense - there is a good reason why there is only one or two makers who produce them.

    Hybrid honesuki/mukimono/paring knife is the only knife in my opinion that could see a limited use and most of it will come from fabricating poultry.

    M


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  10. #60
    I believe the only true single-beveled gyuto Ivet ever seen was Ichimonji Mitsuhide, It was western handled.

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