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Thread: Heavy Chef's Knife - A New Project

  1. #21
    It's an interesting project and I suspect this thread will be up for some time, as the more I think about it, the more I suspect it will be a back-and-forth, once I will start grinding and testing.

    Two things that that highlight my reluctance making thick knives - long term maintenance (thinning) and food release. As some examples of heavier knives on the market demonstrated, the latter can be achieved, but as the knife gets used and sharpened, the former (maintenance) will have to go up. That's the nature of a convex geometry.

    I will grind a test knife in the coming weeks, but the two reasons that made me hesitant to try this knife in the past, are still present. Will see.

    M


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  2. #22
    I solicited input on heavy chefs knives currently used, trying to understand pros and cons of geometries out there. Based on the input, I will be considering three geometries - convex, hybrid, and asymmetric grind. Probably will select one with least cons for a prototype.

    M


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  3. #23
    Need a little guidance here. There are three geometries suitable for a heavy gyuto.

    Heavy convex - Kato, Gengetsu

    Sword grind - Heiji

    Asymmetric - Mizuno

    I will probably end up making a prototype of each and tweak each geometry to increase performance, but wanted to hear your opinion.

    Which geometry do you guys find most attractive and why?

    M

    PS: Just ground a Heiji like prototype, now to tweaking the geometry.


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  4. #24
    Senior Member Baby Huey's Avatar
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    pics pics pics.... lol

  5. #25
    Obviously all those knives have a following amongst members here, and people's vote would depend on personal preference. Heiji has the better food release and is easier to maintain. While a properly thinned Kato is still one of my favourite cutters. I am also a huge fan of my recently acquired Mizuno Honyaki, and it is probably my current favourite. I haven't tried a Gengetsu, but it is high upy list of Gyutos to try. I'm looking forward to seeing these prototypes
    Huw
    In order to make delicious food, you must eat delicious food. Jiro Ono

  6. #26
    Cool.

    Basically, Heiji, Kato and Gengetsu share the same grind, the difference is that Heiji preserves the initial bevels while on the other two they are ground into convex. Mizuno is slightly different, but follows the same principle on the dominant hand side.

    Prototypes are coming, in fact they will be tested in a pro kitchen in about 2 weeks.

    Having learned how to cut bevels properly opens a whole range of possibilities - debas, garasukis, etc.


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  7. #27
    Excuse the mess of my shop and quality of the picture (took with the phone).

    Here are two gyutos that share the same basic geometry, but one left with bevels intact and the other is ground into convex. The former needs bevels refinement - wider toward the tip, but the initial hurdle is overcame.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Heavy Chefs Prototypes.jpg 
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    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  8. #28
    Senior Member Baby Huey's Avatar
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    Looking good. Will be interested in seeing the end results and maybe stand in line for one.

  9. #29
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    Looks good, already!

    I'd like to throw a question at you, and anyone else: If Kato's are one of the best cutters out there, once thinned, are the people thinning the knives with a cm plus flat grind, leading into the heavy convex? Or, are you guys going almost flat, but with a slight rocking motion on your stones, causing a small convex? In my mind, the only way to really thin a knife with heavy convex to the point of actually enhance performance is to virtually flat grind (some human element comes in, of course, causing multiple blended bevels) until it hits the convex that was already ground in. Essentially, what you're making is a Heiji, or exaggerated Itinomonn type of grind. In my experience, concentrating on convexing all the way down to the edge leads to problems. If I'm not mistaken, Marko, your "standard" grind on your gyutos is a very slight convex. These work well, because leadin up to the actual edge, thinking changes to, "ok, now let's make this puppy thin BTE", resulting in a knife that has minor sticktion (nothing to worry about), yet effortlessly cuts.
    09/06

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  10. #30
    When I say properly thinned, I mean for maintenance, I don't believe the majority need thinning OOTB, I try to follow the convex from around 2/3 of the way up the blade, with a 4-5mm "flat ground" secondary bevel then add a micro bevel.
    Huw
    In order to make delicious food, you must eat delicious food. Jiro Ono

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