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Thread: Does this need thinning?

  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by mano View Post
    Then I'll most likely leave it as it is. It glides through meat and can get paper-thin cuts. It can even do this:



    I'll try and make a video of the Singitirin. The fit and finish is outstanding and I can see why you and Jon like burned chestnut handles.
    This is actually not a problem. You can do that even with wusthofs.

  2. #12
    Dont be afraid to thin it Or to put extra low edge on it.
    If you get any problem with it i will be happy to help !!


    Quote Originally Posted by mano View Post
    Then I'll most likely leave it as it is. It glides through meat and can get paper-thin cuts. It can even do this:



    I'll try and make a video of the Singitirin. The fit and finish is outstanding and I can see why you and Jon like burned chestnut handles.

  3. #13
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    If you do thin it, a Shapton Pro 320 does a nice job, and replicates the OOTB finish pretty well, if you're careful.

  4. #14
    So it is just as difficult as thinning a normal high hardness monosteel gyuto? You should not have too much of a problem if you do decide to thin it.

  5. #15

    Zwiefel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by greasedbullet View Post
    So it is just as difficult as thinning a normal high hardness monosteel gyuto? You should not have too much of a problem if you do decide to thin it.
    I think honyaki are harder than most mono-steel knives...not sure by how much though.
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

  6. #16
    Senior Member turbochef422's Avatar
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    Is it just me but I think it looks pretty good and thin.

  7. #17
    monosteel knives from japan tend to be easier to sharpen by a fair bit than most honyaki knives... there are always some exceptions though

  8. #18
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by greasedbullet View Post
    So it is just as difficult as thinning a normal high hardness monosteel gyuto? You should not have too much of a problem if you do decide to thin it.
    it's not really difficult to thin, what is difficult is polishing it afterwards.

  9. #19
    Senior Member Chuckles's Avatar
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    For me very light thinning behind the edge is an important part of learning the grind of a new knife. I would use a sharpie and a fairly high grit stone just to see what angle you would have to use to achieve a performance altering thinning angle. On this knife I would guess you would decide not to go to the coarse stones but that shouldn't stop you from testing the waters. At a minimum it would show what lies ahead in terms of maintaining the knife.

    That choil shot looks hot BTW.
    'I don't want to achieve immortality through my work... I want to achieve it through not dying.' Woody Allen

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by mano View Post
    I'm pretty sure I know the answer already. Singatirin honyaki sujihiki closer to 290 than 270. Marvelous knife in all respects except it wedges a bit with harder foods. With my mediocre sharpening skills I'm hesitant to try thinning a honyaki.

    That is because it was not meant for harder foods.

    Nice knife!

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