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  1. #11
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    A bit thicker is an understatement - the knife is ROBUST.


  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by gyutoguy View Post
    The artifex is not well received I take it? Whats wrong with it? Anyone know of any reasonably priced gyutos in AEBL that have a nice fit and finish?
    The only other AEB-L knives I know that is sub-$200 is the Sakai Grand Chef.

    About the Artifex, it seems like the Richmond lines are less well received in these forums (you can look into that or not, I won't go into detail). The general perception is that the knives are thick behind the edge, and that for the good quality of the steels (ie AEB-L and M390), they need have good heat-treatment, and is usually done in small batches by the craftsman; so they may not be that good for "mass production." Not sure how mass produced Artifices are. I've seen some people comment that Lamson & Goodnow has their heat-tempering down. Who's to really say if Lamson is doing a good job with the AEB-L unless he handles a lot of those knives.

    If the heat-treatment on the knife is good, the Artifex is a real bargain, easy to sharpen, can stay sharp, and good profile. Just thin the knife and should be good to go (that's the idea I plan to do next, after testing it with the current edge geometry).

  3. #13
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    Alright, while we're on the subject, here's a photo, you can be the judge. I don't want to thread-jack.

    https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-5...0/DSC01241.JPG



    Oh, this came to mind, FWIW, the choil and spine comes rounded on the Artifex, while the Masamoto does not.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by GConcept999 View Post
    Alright, while we're on the subject, here's a photo, you can be the judge. I don't want to thread-jack.

    https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-5...0/DSC01241.JPG



    Oh, this came to mind, FWIW, the choil and spine comes rounded on the Artifex, while the Masamoto does not.
    You'd lose a lot less steel rounding the Masamoto choil than you would thinning that artifex--that thing is nasty thick behind the edge.
    one man gathers what another man spills...

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by gyutoguy View Post
    The artifex is not well received I take it? Whats wrong with it? Anyone know of any reasonably priced gyutos in AEBL that have a nice fit and finish?
    Don't get hung up on AEB-L. Geometry and grind is far more important than the steel.

    In short, a poorly ground knife with poor geometry made of super-duper steel = a crap knife.

    Also, not all AEB-L (or any other steel for that matter) is equal. The skill of the craftsman working with the steel is far more important.

  6. #16

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    Thanks for the pictures and replies everyone! Those pictures really brought the point home. I think I will probably go with the Misono or masomoto gyuto, and get a half-ass paring knife for them. The paring knife will probably get beat to hell anyways, people don't look after them

    I do want to make sure the knife is stainless or stain resistant, because I know they won't dry/wipe properly between uses.

  7. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by James View Post
    A bit thicker is an understatement - the knife is ROBUST.

    WOW! My tojiro deba that I convexed has less meat behind the edge than that one. Is that an artifex? Looks like a piece of metal with a tiny v-edge bevel

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by gyutoguy View Post
    Thanks for the pictures and replies everyone! Those pictures really brought the point home. I think I will probably go with the Misono or masomoto gyuto, and get a half-ass paring knife for them. The paring knife will probably get beat to hell anyways, people don't look after them

    I do want to make sure the knife is stainless or stain resistant, because I know they won't dry/wipe properly between uses.
    Why did you decide against the Fujiwaras?

    If you're going to go up to a Masamoto VG, there are other good, if not better, options at that price point.
    Michael
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  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by mhlee View Post
    Why did you decide against the Fujiwaras?

    If you're going to go up to a Masamoto VG, there are other good, if not better, options at that price point.
    I haven't decided against the Fujiwaras. I really like mine, i'm trying to decide if I want to get them a single really nice gyuto or a nice gyuto and a petty. It's a toss up, because they were asking me about a block of 15 henckles they saw at The Bay (I told them not to buy them, they could do better. Why buy 15 knives, when they will only use 2 of them.). They might see more value in 'more knives' as opposed to one really good knife that will outlast their grand-kids. Me being a bit of a 'knife snob', I'd prefer to get one fantastic knife as a present as opposed to multiple lesser quality ones.

    What would you recommend at the masomoto price point that are better? I'm still considering the Fujiwaras (and they might be the best bet, TBH).

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by gyutoguy View Post
    I haven't decided against the Fujiwaras. I really like mine, i'm trying to decide if I want to get them a single really nice gyuto or a nice gyuto and a petty. It's a toss up, because they were asking me about a block of 15 henckles they saw at The Bay (I told them not to buy them, they could do better. Why buy 15 knives, when they will only use 2 of them.). They might see more value in 'more knives' as opposed to one really good knife that will outlast their grand-kids. Me being a bit of a 'knife snob', I'd prefer to get one fantastic knife as a present as opposed to multiple lesser quality ones.

    What would you recommend at the masomoto price point that are better? I'm still considering the Fujiwaras (and they might be the best bet, TBH).
    I haven't used the Masamoto, but I've used the CarboNext, Suisin Western Inox, and several other knives in the sub $200 range.

    Although this is a wa-handled knife, this is a really nice knife, especially for the price. It's better than the CarboNext in my opinion, comes with a saya, is not a laser but also not thick, with good fit and finish, holds an edge well in my limited experience (I've used a friend's).

    http://www.japaneseknifeimports.com/...-wa-gyuto.html

    I gave this exact knife as a wedding gift for a good friend along with the 150 petty: http://www.japaneseknifeimports.com/...-wa-petty.html

    My friend was really happy with these knives.

    If you're set on Western handled knives, I would consider the Suisin Inox western line. I've read time and time again that Masamotos have some quality control/fit and finish issues. (I've never bought a Masamoto western handled knife; I own a Masamoto Tsukiji Yanagiba - lots of variation between the knives I saw at the store - and just bought a Masamoto KS that should be on its way shortly.) The Suisin Inox western that I tried was a really nice knife. I would choose it over the CarboNext. It's a well balanced, agile, knife that's not thin, but not thick, and cuts very well. It's noticeably thinner than the CarboNext behind the edge and is fun to use. I can't attest to its edge retention as I did not sharpen it, but the edge it came with was good and over the course of several days of use, the edge held up.

    One question that I have is do both people cut and cook? If so, you may want to consider getting two less expensive but good gyutos (a 240 and a 210?) and a cheap petty or parer. I got my friend a 240 (for him) and the 150 (for her) because she didn't like to use a larger knife. But, had he said that she would use a larger knife, I would have gotten something else since they cook together.
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

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