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Lucky me!
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Thread: Lucky me!

  1. #1

    Lucky me!

    Just got a hold of this : http://s1361.photobucket.com/user/gregg31/slideshow/ .

    Weight : 134 grams
    Length : 235 mm(blade)
    Height : 43 mm
    Width : 3 mm, 1 mm at 115 mm!
    It's a Fontenille from Thiers, probably from twixt 1920 and 1950, but can't pin it down just yet. Nogent style handle, (rosewod?) with rat tail tang, hammered/riveted at end, and a brass(?) bolster. Super agile, beautifully convexed, which makes for thin, thin thin). Cuts like a champ, and is way stiffer than I would expect. Nice on the stones, quick to sharpen, and has a nice DING sound to it.

    Ok, Ok; what's the catch?, you say. Well, it does have some minor pitting in three places; otherwise she's a little champ for small dinner prep.

    Sorry about the crappy photo quality, never did manage to get the poinšon​ with my cell!

  2. #2
    Twitter: @PeterDaEater

  3. #3
    Gorgeous blade...congratz!
    one man gathers what another man spills...

  4. #4
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    A beauty! In these days nickel silver was common for the bolster, and ebony for the handle. I believe yours is no exception.
    I would remove the pitting at 1cm from the edge. Light horizontal hand sanding following the geometry. Avoid overheating and overgrinding. Again, have a light touch. Start with some P120 sandpaper, and finish with anything in the P240-800 range.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    You may soak the handle in mineral oil.

  6. #6
    Benuser;
    You always have good comments. Nickel siver! (Slaps his head) I really have no excuse for the "brass" call, except that it did
    seem a little yellow at the time, and I was in a bit of a hurry to post before going to work...
    Still not sure about the ebony, though, even if it was common at the time; seems a bit light weight, even if the grain looks about right. Either way, oiled up twice already!
    Haven't worked up the courage to sand it down yet; too hot to sand down a blade at the moment, and I'm out of rough grain paper. I'll try to get in a (decent) photo when I get around to it. In the meantime, I'm really enjoying it for light meal prep!

  7. #7
    OK, I can finally see it, looks interesting to say the least.
    Twitter: @PeterDaEater

  8. #8
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    About ebony handles in the Nogent with the rat tail construction: don't get fooled by the low weight. They happen to be quite thin.
    Bernard Levine wrote about them:

    "The original ebony handles
    tend to split, because they
    are bored down the center
    with a large diameter hole,
    leaving just a thin web of
    wood on the sides. They
    look solid, but they're not."

    That being said, they are the most comfortable handles I know.

  9. #9
    I promise that I'll borrow a decent camera next time!! I was just so jazzed about the find that I didn't have the patience, so I used my cell phone "camera"! (Plus, I'm lousy at photography, even with a good one!)

  10. #10
    Senior Member GeneH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gregg View Post
    Super agile, beautifully convexed..thin, thin thin...Nice on the stones,...and has a nice DING sound to it.
    I want a knife with a nice DING sound. Most of mine have a muted ...thud.

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