Quantcast
usuba: kamagata vs higashigata
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20

Thread: usuba: kamagata vs higashigata

  1. #1

    usuba: kamagata vs higashigata

    For those of you who have some experience with the 2 general usuba types, I'm wondering which you prefer? Seems the kama-type is the more popular and perhaps useful with the tip, but as a frequent tip-chipper I'm kind of drawn to the higashi. I know I've read somewhere before about the intention of the design I but can't remember the details, so I'm also wondering if anyone has found the squarish corner tip of the higashi useful in ways the kama wouldn't be? Of course the advantage of the pointyness of the kama tip is obvious with regard to garnis-cutting.

  2. #2
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Central Jersey
    Posts
    3,037
    I think the square ones are for scooping product. What do I know?
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
    Lyrical arsonist it's arduous spitting this smartest arsenic/

  3. #3
    Kamagata better for chopping negi. Regular square better for spinning kappa. Difference seems small. Get one you love.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Salt Lake City
    Posts
    234
    Two things I think you mean Kamagata and Azumagata. As Hishigata is a reference to the sword tip or Mukimono, of which Kamagata could also be included. (if I'm wrong on that my apologies) I personally own a Kamagata usuba and can say the functional tip is nice, but really from what I have experienced there isn't too much difference if you are just planning on katsurimuki and regular veg cutting the square tip will do just fine. For more detailed work and slightly decorative things the Kamagata would probably be a better fit.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Hawaii
    Posts
    1,330
    I got the Kamagata cus I liked the look better

  6. #6
    I tend to like the look of the higashi better - though not all, depends on the maker. Not if they're too square. I love the look of the Shig version, and the kama as well. If I can borrow a vendor's photo - I don't know why a usuba would be photographed with sushi beside it, but certainly looks a cool blade here:



    Quote Originally Posted by ThEoRy View Post
    I think the square ones are for scooping product. What do I know?
    It's a good point. I hadn't thought of that. Yeah, probably a bit better.

    Quote Originally Posted by eshua View Post
    Kamagata better for chopping negi. Regular square better for spinning kappa.
    Thanks, eshua. Didn't get this at first, but turns out he means katsuramuki. Yes, I can imagine that too - due to the geometry.

    Quote Originally Posted by Sarge View Post
    Two things I think you mean Kamagata and Azumagata. As Hishigata is a reference to the sword tip or Mukimono, of which Kamagata could also be included.
    Actually, I think with the squarish-tipped azumagata/higashigata I think it's an example of different makers using a couple of different names for the same thing. Higashigata 東型 just means eastern-type, which is logical as it originated in Kanto.

  7. #7
    the history of the shapes is a bit different, as is the way the used to be used. Because of the tip on the kamagata usuba, chefs can use it for regular usuba work and mukimono (design work), and tend to do so. In kanto, chefs that do mukimono tend to use a mukimono bocho as well. Of course, at the best restaurants and with the most skilled chefs, they still tend to use the most task specific knife (but, not always).

  8. #8
    Is it not something regional ??
    I dont think there is any real purpose between this 2 but i might be wrong .

  9. #9
    there's a bit more history to it than just that... i'm in a rush right now, but if i can remember tonight, i will explain in more depth. It will also clear up the difference between takobiki and yanagiba.

  10. #10
    so here we go... in the kanto region, back in the day they used to sit while cutting, making their cutting boards higher relative to their bodies. This necessitated the use of flater edged knives (takobiki, higashi-gata usuba, etc), as well as the lack of a sharp tip, which would be useless and problematic from this position. In the Kansai region, chefs stood while cutting, this making the curved profile of yanagiba more useful than takobiki. Likewise, the tip of the kamagata usuba is easier to use from a standing position than a sitting position. Moreover, the home of kaiseki ryori is kyoto. In this kind of cuisine, mukimono (decorative cutting technique) is often seen. The tip of the kamagata usuba is very useful when doing this kind of detail-oriented cutting. Mukimono bocho is also sometimes used, but it seems to be a bit more common in the kanto region, as the higashigata-usuba doesnt have a functional tip for this kind of thing.

    Hope this helps you guys better understand these knives.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •