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Thread: Wagyu Beef

  1. #1
    Senior Member chefcomesback's Avatar
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    Wagyu Beef

    One of the great things about being in down under is you get really good wagyu. I have used kobe labeled American wagyu in US before and I have to tell you this is whole different thing. Most American wagyu is a cross bred with Black Angus and genetically they carry %25 pure wagyu genetics. Marbling is better than your black angus but nowhere near the real thing. Also the meat is darker.
    Australia being one of the largest exporter of Wagyu beef to Japan , most of the full blood (F4-F3 gets send direct to Japan) F2 (%75 wagyu -%25 holstein or angus ) or F1 (%50 full blood %50 holstein or angus) is common in high end restaurants.
    The sirloin in the picture is F2 with Marble grade being 8 (in australia Marbling grade goes to up 9+ , altough the westerners don't like the super pinkish appearence in Japan you can get it up to 12!)Name:  wagyu sirloin.jpg
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    I love processing wagyu , love the beef scraps
    Enjoy!!

  2. #2
    Oh wow, that tenderloin looks sick!!!

  3. #3
    Senior Member chefcomesback's Avatar
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    It is actually striploin (sirloin )
    Once it is rolled and portioned , it holds it round shape really well.
    You got to remove to cling wrap before cooking it !

  4. #4
    Senior Member Brad Gibson's Avatar
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    i work in the only steakhouse in san diego that offers this all the time. its so damn good.
    "A recipe has no soul. You as the cook must bring soul to the recipe." -Thomas Keller

  5. #5
    Senior Member Brad Gibson's Avatar
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    we do the ribeye 8 ounce and 16 ounce and the 10 oz new york steak all the time. its amazingly tender and deliciously marbled
    "A recipe has no soul. You as the cook must bring soul to the recipe." -Thomas Keller

  6. #6
    Senior Member chefcomesback's Avatar
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    ?
    Hmmm...
    Anyway , we also make a sriracha sauce inhouse , right after I have trimmed this beef I have shaved off same end pieces and we dipped them in a mixture of olive oil , light soy and homemade sriracha ...
    Nutty , umami , fatty goodness...

  7. #7
    Senior Member Brad Gibson's Avatar
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    Homemade sriracha!? I'd like to know your recipe for this. Living in california, we go through a s*** load of this product at my restaurant. I'd love to know how to make something better!
    "A recipe has no soul. You as the cook must bring soul to the recipe." -Thomas Keller

  8. #8
    Senior Member chefcomesback's Avatar
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    I had to do it because when I came to OZ 3 years ago , I couldnt find it ! I found couple places were cartying it then I started researching the origins and how to make it.
    I found the story of the sauce (immigrants trying to replicate what they were using in their home country , giving a shot in CA i guess and becoming a big hit)
    The recipe I found was from web , I dont remember the exact web page but it is super easy to make:
    16 Red chiles (seeded ,rough chopped, if you want more heat leave some seeds)
    4 cloves of garlic sliced
    3 oz palm sugar -grated (you can sub with brown sugar altough taste changes a bit)
    white vinegar to cover.
    For quick sauce bring them to boil , blend in vitaprep , strain voila..
    But if you want the real deal , ferment in room temp at least 2 days then , boil , puree , strain
    It is worth trying

  9. #9
    Which restaurant in SD? I am there all the time on business and would love to stop by.

  10. #10
    Oh my goodness!!! Look at that marbling! I'm so jealous of whoever at that.

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