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Thread: Identify Unknown Chef's Knife Estate Find and Suggestions to clean and re-sell? (2 of 2 threads)

  1. #1
    Senior Member GeneH's Avatar
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    Identify Unknown Chef's Knife Estate Find and Suggestions to clean and re-sell? (2 of 2 threads)

    Here is the other knife she picked up, again for half-a-buck. Can you identify the markings?

    ( Bigger photos in the gallery here: http://geneh.smugmug.com/Other/Kitch...1796417_Q8zQxQ )

    (I am helping a coworker who supplements her income reselling antiques and other stuff. On my suggestion she started watching for carbon knifes and landed this unknown knife at a garage sale. I want to clean it up and rehandle it so she can net the most from selling it. So my question is how much should I clean it up with find steel wool and sharpen it, or pretty much leave it alone? What might sell higher? The edge is actually nice, not dished from use / sharpening, but this blade does have a bend in it. It's very thin, light and flexible. Attached are pictures. She would really appreciate anything we can do for her.



    Bend in Blade:



    Handle pulled off (ugh, the SMELL!) Showing the bolster and tang.


    Markings:


  2. #2
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    sachem allison's Avatar
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    pretty sure the top letters could be LF&C which would be Lander's Frary and Clarke Universal brand They were famous for both the universal brand and the AETNA works brand. They made everything from coffee percolators to toasters. The company started up in 1865 and the universal line started sometime in the earlier 1890's The discontinued making cutlery in 1950 and went out of business in 1865. They lasted exactly 100 years, The knife you have there is a very well made chef knife dating from around the turn of the century to around 1920. It has pewter bolsters and ebony handle. 12 in carbon steel blade. At the time this was made it was one of the best around and it still is.
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

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    Yep looks like the one I have. Here is my post from back when I found mine

    http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/sh...rsal-L-F-amp-C

    I found that once mine was cleaned up the steel took on a wonderful patina

  4. #4
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    I meant went out of business in 1965
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Brad Gibson's Avatar
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    Son you are a knife god. How the heck do you know all this stuff?! You are the man, MAN!
    "A recipe has no soul. You as the cook must bring soul to the recipe." -Thomas Keller

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    Senior Member hobbitling's Avatar
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    if it's an ebony handle, What are the streaks of color on the handle?

  7. #7
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    tape and crud
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

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    Senior Member GeneH's Avatar
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    Great information, thank you. We were both pretty surprised at the age. It's fun to find things like this.

    So now what? Any clues what we should do so Roberta can get the most $ out of it? Re-glue the original (ugh) handle back on - seems like a poor proposition unless a collector stumbles on her sale and the scratches on the blade doesn't matter either, or do I re-handle it for her and make it useful to someone? Suggestions where to look for more info about how to restore for resale?

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    Make it useful in the condition it is in now no collector would want it. Rehandle it an take some fine emery get the rust off , sharpen and oil it and it will be good to go. This isn't one you need to make new. It isn't particularly valuable . it is just a good cutter when in good shape. I would say after a good rehandle and blade cleanup she could get $100-$150 on the retail market and that's from someone who knows what they are looking at. As is about $ 25 to$40 again if someone knows what they are looking at.
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  10. #10
    Senior Member GeneH's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sachem allison View Post
    Make it useful in the condition it is in now no collector would want it. Rehandle it an take some fine emery get the rust off , sharpen and oil it and it will be good to go. This isn't one you need to make new. It isn't particularly valuable . it is just a good cutter when in good shape. I would say after a good rehandle and blade cleanup she could get $100-$150 on the retail market and that's from someone who knows what they are looking at. As is about $ 25 to$40 again if someone knows what they are looking at.
    Thank you for that. This sounds like a low risk, and somewhat challenging project to fix up. Not even sure how to go about it with that hooked-in bolster.

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