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Thread: Chopping on a board with feet?

  1. #11
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    Sounds like a good plan. Also you can argue that food cooked in carbon steel or cast iron wok tastes better.

  2. #12
    Oh wait, my wife already has a cheapie board from before. Okay, I'll have to use that. It'll be alright.

    About woks, I have 2 carbon steel and 2 cast iron woks already. Plus 1 cast aluminum. And the 1 non-stick coated POS wok that's no longer non-stick after just a month or two. My wife is quite amenable to using all the different woks (as long as I'm the one taking things in and out of the cupboard) - she just won't look too kindly on my getting another one
    Len

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marko Tsourkan View Post
    cleaver marks will be deeper on your Boardsmith than knife marks, so you will probably regret it as soon as you see them.

    Feet are good for chopping, as you get some shock absorption. Real butcher blocks are up to 2' tall, and weigh a ton.

    I would use a block on top of your Boardsmith for chopping.

    M
    + 1.

  4. #14
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    Ha ha, now I can under stand "more?" having sort of similar issue myself.

  5. #15
    Non-stick Wok = yard sale item. I like that round block I might have to get one for "duck work"

  6. #16
    Senior Member Mucho Bocho's Avatar
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    Len, You could even put that round board on a wooden stool. You'll make an intimidating impression when People come by. Best to raise your bone chopper high over your head to get some leverage and momentum, and hit the chicken on the board like a 16 YO would at the State Fair trying for a state championship.

  7. #17
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    I chop chicken for my dogs and use an old edge grain board for that. The boardsmith only sees the good knives.
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mucho Bocho View Post
    Len, Check this one out

    http://www.wokshop.com/HTML/products...ing-block.html

    Looks like a real deal chinese chopping block. Like the ones found in china Town

    One of my chopping blocks is a Chinese section-of-a-tree-trunk kind. To make storage easier I had a small arc sawed off so I could up-end it. Mine has a stainless steel loop attached to the side which makes handling easier. My main complaint about this board is that the surface became uneven and I gave up trying to sand it flat. I really like the large Chinese blocks that are used by the roast pork (siew yok), barbecued pork (char siew) and roast duck (siew ngap) sellers in Chinese restaurants here in Melbourne and all over Hong Kong and Canton. The well worn ones with a slight dip in the middle from years of chopping have a convincing authenticity and authority!

  9. #19
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    why does it matter if you get marks in the board? it's meant to be used? if it's that important why not put a thin cheapo plastic board on top?

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