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Thread: Suisin INOX vs Suisin INOX Honyaki

  1. #21
    As to the honyaki, I believe that Suisin is referring to monosteel. Mizu-honyaki I believe is what people generally refer to as honyaki, meaning differentially hardened and with a hamon.

    Though I could be completely wrong:>)

    edit: just realized that Z beat me to it on the first page...
    one man gathers what another man spills...

  2. #22
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    More specifically I believe Mizu-Honyaki is water quenched.

  3. #23
    to clarify, both the suisin inox honyaki and inox western are zen-ko blades, not honyaki in the traditional sense. Traditional honyaki can be done in both water and oil for what its worth. Anyways, the suisin inox western is aus8 at about 58-59 hrc, while the inox honyaki is 19c27 at about 61hrc. The inox honyaki is thinner overall, has a japanese style handle, better fit and finish (rounded spine and choil for example), and is thinner behind the edge. The suisin inox western is easier to sharpen, a bit thicker, a bit thicker behind the edge, western handled, and does not have a rounded spine and choil (but is not particularly sharp). The inox honyaki has better edge retention though.

    Any other questions?

  4. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by JBroida View Post
    to clarify, both the suisin inox honyaki and inox western are zen-ko blades, not honyaki in the traditional sense. Traditional honyaki can be done in both water and oil for what its worth. Anyways, the suisin inox western is aus8 at about 58-59 hrc, while the inox honyaki is 19c27 at about 61hrc. The inox honyaki is thinner overall, has a japanese style handle, better fit and finish (rounded spine and choil for example), and is thinner behind the edge. The suisin inox western is easier to sharpen, a bit thicker, a bit thicker behind the edge, western handled, and does not have a rounded spine and choil (but is not particularly sharp). The inox honyaki has better edge retention though.

    Any other questions?
    I feel like this needs a "boom" at the end

  5. #25

  6. #26
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBroida View Post
    zen-ko blades
    There it is. That's the term for it. I remember we had this conversation previously a few years ago but I couldn't remember what Jon called it. Thanks for clarifying the western inox construction as well.
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  7. #27
    Senior Member Matus's Avatar
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    Jon (and others), thank you. I do not think I have any questions left on the topic.

  8. #28
    daveb's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JBroida View Post

    Any other questions?
    Not getting off that easy Jon. Is final answer that INOX is generic term used for stainless?

    I've been chasing this question quite a bit. I've a Suisin IH Gyuto. Like it. Understand that Suisin Western INOX is AUS8. And that the "Special" INOX in Korin's recent passaround is AUS10 - a little harder than 8. I also have a Tadasuna INOX suji that I like a lot. Gator's site suggests that Tad INOX is gengetsu(sp?) - the same steel Suisin uses in single bevel stainless but does not call INOX?

    Finally, if INOX = stainless, would it correct to refer to the Ginga as inox?

    Thanks. And welcome back.
    Dave
    Older and wider.

  9. #29
    inox is short for inoxydable in french... its popularly used to refer to any and all stainless in many parts of europe as well as aisa.

    Tadatsuna inox was listed as ginsanko (not gengetsu... thats a line we have custom made for us). Its different from the steel in the inox honyaki.

    Anyways, any stainless steel could be called inox... gesshin ginga, suisin inox and inox honyaki, misono stainless, sakai yusuke... even shun.

    On the single bevel knives, suisin makes 2 types that i know of right now... inox honyaki (19c27) and ginsanko (which is a clad knife using softer stainless cladding and harder ginsanko as the cutting edge).

  10. #30
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by daveb View Post
    I've been chasing this question quite a bit.
    a look at any French or Italian to English dictionary would have solved this for you. Or looking at a Beretta 92 with stainless slide.

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