Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2345 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 46

Thread: Best grind on a production knife?

  1. #31
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    washington dc
    Posts
    1,469
    have you tried easing the shoulder? wonder how that would effect performance.

  2. #32
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Cincinnati, Oh
    Posts
    3,701
    Easing the shoulders on Heijis typically increases stickage, which negates increased cutting ability.

  3. #33
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    washington dc
    Posts
    1,469
    and is that the case with most other knives that have a shoulder about half way down the blade? i never tried doing that for fear of that exact reason. i like blades that push foods away vs gliding through. for example tanaka blue is the thinnest blade i have behind the edge but i don't care for it as it's a glider.

  4. #34
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Cincinnati, Oh
    Posts
    3,701
    The ones I've tried, yes. Heiji, Yoshihiro, Tanaka, etc.

  5. #35
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Hawaii
    Posts
    1,516
    In any case it is a superb geometry,it is very slight near the edge.I think some makers make the area just above the edge thinner making the knives easy to sharpen on whetstones.I think Jon is right that is not done on a wheel.

    Americans do know concave thats for sure.Some makers take the easy way of blade thinning by grinding a concave bevel on both sides with a grinding wheel. Cutco knives does this,you get a thin edge,but the overall geometry from from spine to edge does not cut anywhere close to a fine Japanese blade.Even Ming's Areo knife has a concave grind.

    Most American & European production blades are thick behind the edge.Some makers have tried a more Japan style Gyuto simply because they work better.I have used German & Forschner blades in production kitchens.I will take a Japan blade anyday.

  6. #36
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Cincinnati, Oh
    Posts
    3,701
    Try sharpening a Heiji or Takeda and not taking concavity into account: it'll suck. Cutco these knives are not.

  7. #37
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    sydney,nsw
    Posts
    417
    i know my kono hd is a laser but it has very good food release i mirror polished it which helps a bit imo.

  8. #38
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Amstelveen, The Netherlands
    Posts
    2,370
    Quote Originally Posted by EdipisReks View Post
    Try sharpening a Heiji or Takeda and not taking concavity into account: it'll suck.
    How do you deal with that concavity?

  9. #39
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Hawaii
    Posts
    1,516
    Quote Originally Posted by Benuser View Post
    How do you deal with that concavity?
    I was wondering that as well,I have sharpened a Takeda & a couple Carters.I would love to get my hands on a Heiji only have seen pictures of it.

  10. #40
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Pensacola, FL, USA
    Posts
    4,047
    Quote Originally Posted by ar11 View Post
    Sorry should have clarified, falling through food without much sticktion (sp?) and minimal steering. I haven't handled many knives, but hear people talking constantly about messed up grinds which diminishes performance.
    Of the OOTB production knives I've used, the Suisin Inox honyaki, the Tadatsuna, the Sakai Yusuke and the Gesshin Ginga were the best at "falling through food". All of them had moderate "stiction", which is the tradeoff you make. All of them have thin blades, and are in the "laser" or "laser-like" category.

    You mentioned "messed up grinds", and this is usually seen in thin knives that are not thin "behind the edge" so that it takes a lot of force to cut food like carrots. These knives need anywhere from minor to major tweaks to be good cutters. Some that I have used are the Richmond Artifex and Addict, the Hiromoto AS, the Bu-Rei-Zen (Blazen), the Fujiwara FKH and the Hattori HD.

    Knives by Murray Carter would fall into the first category, but I don't consider them "production" knives.

    Hope this may answer your question.

    Rick
    “I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand.”

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •