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Thread: Best grind on a production knife?

  1. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by Pensacola Tiger View Post
    Of the OOTB production knives I've used, the Suisin Inox honyaki, the Tadatsuna, the Sakai Yusuke and the Gesshin Ginga were the best at "falling through food". All of them had moderate "stiction", which is the tradeoff you make. All of them have thin blades, and are in the "laser" or "laser-like" category.

    You mentioned "messed up grinds", and this is usually seen in thin knives that are not thin "behind the edge" so that it takes a lot of force to cut food like carrots. These knives need anywhere from minor to major tweaks to be good cutters. Some that I have used are the Richmond Artifex and Addict, the Hiromoto AS, the Bu-Rei-Zen (Blazen), the Fujiwara FKH and the Hattori HD.

    Knives by Murray Carter would fall into the first category, but I don't consider them "production" knives.

    Hope this may answer your question.

    Rick
    Thanks Rick that's what I was looking to know. I'm just getting started and trying to experience what's the best of production knives (ie not knives you have to get on a waiting list to order). Actually good to know what knives are subpar performers not to waste money on those.

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by ar11 View Post
    Thanks Rick that's what I was looking to know. I'm just getting started and trying to experience what's the best of production knives (ie not knives you have to get on a waiting list to order). Actually good to know what knives are subpar performers not to waste money on those.
    One of the great benefits of KKF is a pretty good passaround system, where you can try out a knife for the price of postage and insurance. Keep your eyes open for a passaround you might be interested in. The more exposure you get to various knives the better, and it beats buying them.
    “I hear and I forget. I see and I remember. I do and I understand.”

  3. #43
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Benuser View Post
    How do you deal with that concavity?
    You grind as flat as you can. You'll end up using multiple angles.

  4. #44
    My Gesshin Ginga 240mm grind was beautiful out of the box. Not overly sharp but it still slices very well because of that very nice thin grind. It's probably time to take it to my stones for a quick touch-up since it has been my go-to knife that sees daily use. Even last night it was used for dinner prep and finished up by cleanly slicing through a large watermelon like it was soft butter.

  5. #45
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tomsch View Post
    My Gesshin Ginga 240mm grind was beautiful out of the box. Not overly sharp but it still slices very well because of that very nice thin grind. It's probably time to take it to my stones for a quick touch-up since it has been my go-to knife that sees daily use. Even last night it was used for dinner prep and finished up by cleanly slicing through a large watermelon like it was soft butter.
    I would just put a micro bevel on it, with a finishing stone, if it's not chipped. Keep that stock grind as long as possible.

  6. #46
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    deleted :-)

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