Quantcast
1st Nakiri Choices
Page 1 of 7 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 62

Thread: 1st Nakiri Choices

  1. #1

    1st Nakiri Choices

    Just getting started in a home knife "setup"....I will be the only cook/user/eater...so light usage 2 to 3 times a week......looking to add a nakiri with wa handle.....I will be using a CC Model XV as my sharpening system (and I am aware of its limitations)...Budget is under $200.....because of CC limitations....dont want to "over buy" but would like a nice knife....carbon is OK....I like the wider profile of the Masakage's.

    I know I'm not going to get a "screaming sharp" edge with a CC....so what carbon steel is best...given these demands? What brands would you recommend?

    Thanks for the guidance!

  2. #2
    Senior Member Brad Gibson's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    842
    I just got my hands on a shigefusa KU Nikiri and I love it. It cost just under 200 as well. I also tried the gesshin uraku Nikiri and it was quite the performer in a stainless clad that was a steal with saya for 125 bucks from JKI. Good luck with your search!
    "A recipe has no soul. You as the cook must bring soul to the recipe." -Thomas Keller

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    697
    If you look at offerings from JKI you can take a look at Zakuri as well. It is a great performer and feels nicely balanced. Zakuri makes workhorse knives that are a pleasure to pick up and really use. Worth a look.

  4. #4
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    5,160
    I'm a big fan of nakiris, and this is likely because I use them at home (when I use one), for my wife and myself. One really great thing about a nakiri is that you can get a knife that performs unbelievably well for a very reasonable price, when compared to a gyuto or even a suji. The limitations of the blade shape can be made up with pairing it with a petty, or another knife with a tip for trimming, coring, etc. Of course, this adds up and you can easily get into beautiful gyuto territory for that price.

    With that in mind, for a home cook, a medium sized Carter Funayuki will do everything you will likely need, and especially when cooking for one. A couple other very nice options would be Itinomonn (from Maxim), Yamawaku (if you can wait for eBay), Tanaka (metalmaster), or maybe a Carbonext, based on their reputation.

    I'm currently using an Itinomonn gyuto at home, and a Harner at work. I must say, I'm very pleasantly surprised by the Itinomonn (everyone knows how great Harners are) and I think Maxim might get more requests for them as more people give them a chance. Put it this way: I already have my next one picked out....

    Now, I hate to mention it, but why not try out a 1k stone like a King? They're cheap and very effective. You can even do light dry stropping to maintain your edge until you get comfortable with sharpening. Just a thought.

    PS. Welcome!
    09/06

    Take a look around at: www.sharpandshinyshop.com

    Email me at: tmclean@sharpandshinyshop.com

  5. #5
    If you like Masakage profile why don't you get one? I have Masakage Shimo Nakiri and I love it. The Fit and Finish is not the best but for the price is very decent. The main complaint I have is not rounded spine and choil. Nothing that little bit of sand paper can not fix It gets very sharp, it is very sharp OOTB. Looks nice and if you like the profile, why not to get it?

    Masakage has few different lines, so you can choose what alloy and finish you want - Stainless VG10, Shiogami (white) #2 Carbon or Blue Super. If I am not mistaken all of their Nakiris run under $200 mark.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Justin0505's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    1,434
    Quote Originally Posted by Lefty View Post
    I'm a big fan of nakiris, and this is likely because I use them at home (when I use one), for my wife and myself. One really great thing about a nakiri is that you can get a knife that performs unbelievably well for a very reasonable price, when compared to a gyuto or even a suji. The limitations of the blade shape can be made up with pairing it with a petty, or another knife with a tip for trimming, coring, etc. Of course, this adds up and you can easily get into beautiful gyuto territory for that price.

    With that in mind, for a home cook, a medium sized Carter Funayuki will do everything you will likely need, and especially when cooking for one. A couple other very nice options would be Itinomonn (from Maxim), Yamawaku (if you can wait for eBay), Tanaka (metalmaster), or maybe a Carbonext, based on their reputation.

    I'm currently using an Itinomonn gyuto at home, and a Harner at work. I must say, I'm very pleasantly surprised by the Itinomonn (everyone knows how great Harners are) and I think Maxim might get more requests for them as more people give them a chance. Put it this way: I already have my next one picked out....

    Now, I hate to mention it, but why not try out a 1k stone like a King? They're cheap and very effective. You can even do light dry stropping to maintain your edge until you get comfortable with sharpening. Just a thought.

    PS. Welcome!
    +1

    If you're really stuck on using that CC, then don't spent over $60 on a nakiri, because there's a very good chance that the CC will mangle it.
    I don't want to sound too harsh or like a snob, but it's not a question of the CC having "limitations" its just flat-out the wrong tool for this application. Honestly, saying "I'm going to spend $200 on a nakiri and maintain it with a CC" is akin to saying "I'm going to go buy a Ducati and maintain it myself using the crowbar, sledge, and hedge trimmer I have out in my shed."
    Sharpeners like that are not designed to work with knives as thin or edges as acute as you'll find on j-knives. It's also going to be very difficult to maintain the nice flat edge profile / grind evenly without putting divots or waves in the edge and/or burning the steel/ ruining the temper.
    Even if you manage to sharpen it without totally wrecking it, the performance will degrade very quickly for a few compounding reasons:
    1) the edge that machines like the CC created are hollow ground and inherently weaker / shorter lasting than those made the correct way by hand
    2) because of #1, and the fact that you have no way of stopping / maintaining the edge in between sharpening , you will need to sharpen more often
    3) machines like the CC remove too much steel with each sharpening session
    4) because of points 1-3 you will wear your knife much faster and as the edge travels up the blade, you will have no way of thinning the steel behind the edge, so with each sharpening the performance will degrade until you eventually reach the point where the edge is sharp, but the area behind it is so thick, it will feel like you're trying to to cut with a bushcraft knife.

    So, please, just get a frickin stone and learn to do things the right way.
    If you have the motor skills to use a CC without damaging your knives, then you can learn to use a stone.
    It's really not that intimidating, and an inexpensive nakiri is, IMO one of the easiest knives to learn on.
    You will get really good results really quickly, and you'll feel like a hero. Check out Murray Carter and JKI Jon on youtube or buy Dave Martell's DVD and then then develop a style / motion that work for you.
    Get a Nakiri in white #2 and 1 or 2 stones. Spend less than <$100 on the nakiri and a little >$100 on stone(s).
    A cheap knife is less intimidating to experiment on, and the soft iron cladding and simple carbon steel core is much easier to sharpen than something really fancy.
    If down the road you want to upgrade (and no matter how good your first knife is, you'll always want more) you can sell your first one (but no one ever does) and you'll have a better idea of what you want in a knife when you're spending more money.

    1000-1200grit is a versatile range if you get just one stone, but something like an 800 and 4000-5000grit is more fun and will give you a lot more options/ make your sharpening life easier.
    There are plenty of newbie sharpening threads on here, just do some reading... .or take the lazy approach and toss up another thread and the stone geeks will be all over it.
    "I gotta tell ya, this is pretty terrific. Ha hahaha, YEAH!" - Moe (w/ 2 knives). http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YVt4U...layer_embedded

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    452
    My rec for a under 200 dollar nakiri is the Konosuke HD.

    But I agree. If you choose to use the Chef's Choice sharpener, there is no point in buying a nice nakiri. You need to learn how to sharpen with whetstones. But a cheap nakiri and a few whetstones.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Mucho Bocho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    1,448
    Justin, Such sage advise. Hopefully one will heed your words cause they will sure alleviate lots of frustration and wasted $.

    Quote Originally Posted by Justin0505 View Post
    +1

    If you're really stuck on using that CC, then don't spent over $60 on a nakiri, because there's a very good chance that the CC will mangle it.
    I don't want to sound too harsh or like a snob, but it's not a question of the CC having "limitations" its just flat-out the wrong tool for this application. Honestly, saying "I'm going to spend $200 on a nakiri and maintain it with a CC" is akin to saying "I'm going to go buy a Ducati and maintain it myself using the crowbar, sledge, and hedge trimmer I have out in my shed."
    Sharpeners like that are not designed to work with knives as thin or edges as acute as you'll find on j-knives. It's also going to be very difficult to maintain the nice flat edge profile / grind evenly without putting divots or waves in the edge and/or burning the steel/ ruining the temper.
    Even if you manage to sharpen it without totally wrecking it, the performance will degrade very quickly for a few compounding reasons:
    1) the edge that machines like the CC created are hollow ground and inherently weaker / shorter lasting than those made the correct way by hand
    2) because of #1, and the fact that you have no way of stopping / maintaining the edge in between sharpening , you will need to sharpen more often
    3) machines like the CC remove too much steel with each sharpening session
    4) because of points 1-3 you will wear your knife much faster and as the edge travels up the blade, you will have no way of thinning the steel behind the edge, so with each sharpening the performance will degrade until you eventually reach the point where the edge is sharp, but the area behind it is so thick, it will feel like you're trying to to cut with a bushcraft knife.

    So, please, just get a frickin stone and learn to do things the right way.
    If you have the motor skills to use a CC without damaging your knives, then you can learn to use a stone.
    It's really not that intimidating, and an inexpensive nakiri is, IMO one of the easiest knives to learn on.
    You will get really good results really quickly, and you'll feel like a hero. Check out Murray Carter and JKI Jon on youtube or buy Dave Martell's DVD and then then develop a style / motion that work for you.
    Get a Nakiri in white #2 and 1 or 2 stones. Spend less than <$100 on the nakiri and a little >$100 on stone(s).
    A cheap knife is less intimidating to experiment on, and the soft iron cladding and simple carbon steel core is much easier to sharpen than something really fancy.
    If down the road you want to upgrade (and no matter how good your first knife is, you'll always want more) you can sell your first one (but no one ever does) and you'll have a better idea of what you want in a knife when you're spending more money.

    1000-1200grit is a versatile range if you get just one stone, but something like an 800 and 4000-5000grit is more fun and will give you a lot more options/ make your sharpening life easier.
    There are plenty of newbie sharpening threads on here, just do some reading... .or take the lazy approach and toss up another thread and the stone geeks will be all over it.
    One thing you can give and still keep...is your word.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Justin0505 View Post
    +1

    If you're really stuck on using that CC, then don't spent over $60 on a nakiri, because there's a very good chance that the CC will mangle it.
    I don't want to sound too harsh or like a snob, but it's not a question of the CC having "limitations" its just flat-out the wrong tool for this application. Honestly, saying "I'm going to spend $200 on a nakiri and maintain it with a CC" is akin to saying "I'm going to go buy a Ducati and maintain it myself using the crowbar, sledge, and hedge trimmer I have out in my shed."
    I appreciate the feedback and advice....from what I've read the CC is not as bad as you describe it....I know it is not as good as stones or an EP.....BUT I really dont want to "go down that road"....If its an appropiate analogy....I buy preground coffee...not Maxwell House either....so I dont mind spending a little extra....But coffee "folk" probably frown on someone not grinding there own beans...I dont have time to or care to....but do know its probably better.....so back to knives....

    I wasn't going to "drop" $200...that was my limit.....just want a good value with better F&F.....after some more research im leaning towards a Gesshin Uraka......

    Again I appreciate the feedback.....just alittle frustrated that "everyone" thinks everyone should hand sharpen or they should just go to WalMart and buy a Farberware set and be happy....there has to be a middle ground........and for me a CC with good value knives seems to be an OK place to be....

  10. #10
    Senior Member Mucho Bocho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Raleigh, NC
    Posts
    1,448
    Wj, You're right. Absolutely by all means buy a decent knife and use the CC with it. When you do please take before and after pics so that others can learn from your approach. If you could, take some real close shots of the primary bevel too so we can see all the changes the CC is going to make.
    One thing you can give and still keep...is your word.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •