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Thread: natural stone recommendation

  1. #1
    Senior Member ramenlegend's Avatar
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    natural stone recommendation

    I'm looking to try out a natural stone. Any recommendations on a somewhat inexpensive stone for a "natural" noobie? also, do you need multiple natural stones? for example, would it be ridiculous to start on a synthetic and finish on a natural? i'll throw out a price point of under $150, but I'm flexible.

  2. #2
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    It is quite common to start on synthetics and then finish on a natural stone, in fact this is my most common sharpening regime depending on the knife.

    For knives, and also for beginners, look for natural stones that are softer, and create more slurry.

    A Takashima Awasedo from Japanese Knife Imports is a great starting point. The medium sized one is $150 but if you can spring an extra $50 for the large, this is a stone of such quality that you won't 'need' to upgrade unless you really get bitten by the bug.

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    I've tried a handful of natural stones in the lower grit ranges, but found the ones I tried to be slower than synthetics. I've heard from a number of folks that it's pretty common to start on synthetics and progress to naturals. I usually start with synthetics up to 1200 or 2000 grit, then jump to naturals for finishing and/or polishing. I happen to have multiple natural stones, but I think a single good muddy finishing stone would suffice for most folks.

    What synthetic stones do you have now that plan on starting with?

  4. #4
    Senior Member ramenlegend's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by vinster View Post
    I've tried a handful of natural stones in the lower grit ranges, but found the ones I tried to be slower than synthetics. I've heard from a number of folks that it's pretty common to start on synthetics and progress to naturals. I usually start with synthetics up to 1200 or 2000 grit, then jump to naturals for finishing and/or polishing. I happen to have multiple natural stones, but I think a single good muddy finishing stone would suffice for most folks.

    What synthetic stones do you have now that plan on starting with?
    well, I'm currently using a shun 1000/6000 but I'm planning on picking up a beston 500 to try out.

  5. #5
    Might be slight offtopic, but why would one prefer Jnat over nice synthetic with high grit?

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Ruso View Post
    Might be slight offtopic, but why would one prefer Jnat over nice synthetic with high grit?
    How high of a grit?
    High synthetic grit does not necessarily equal a good edge.
    Naturals give nice versatility, and also are best for produce kasumi finish on traditional blades.
    It is a matter of preference, I guess, what you like.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Ruso View Post
    Might be slight offtopic, but why would one prefer Jnat over nice synthetic with high grit?


    Quote Originally Posted by mainaman View Post
    How high of a grit?
    High synthetic grit does not necessarily equal a good edge.
    Naturals give nice versatility, and also are best for produce kasumi finish on traditional blades.
    It is a matter of preference, I guess, what you like.

    Plus, fine naturals can (although not always) significantly reduce a burr/wire edge which I've come to appreciate on single beveled knives.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Martell View Post




    Plus, fine naturals can (although not always) significantly reduce a burr/wire edge which I've come to appreciate on single beveled knives.
    Agree, I look at my edges ona very regular basis under magnification and very rarely see burs, at least the steels I work with.

  9. #9
    "It's the Indian, not the arrow."

    Your stone isn't 'significantly reducing a burr/wire edge', the techniques and motions you're replicating are actively reducing the burr.

  10. #10
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    cheezit, you have an awesome screen name. But i think Dave knows what hes talking about when it comes to sharpening, its his business. literally.

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