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Thread: Suggestions for Gyuto(s) for the left-handed.

  1. #11
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    The Takeda is 50/50 or can be easily made so if the bevel is slightly asymmetric. The blade is just a flat or slightly concave piece of steel, and there is no concern about asymmetry. But it's a pretty steep price for a 'starter' gyuto.

  2. #12
    Senior Member stevenStefano's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by euphorbioid View Post
    . I'm not sure a gyuto with one convex side and one flat side really makes any sense or difference.
    I have a custom lefty knife with approximately an 80/20 grind and it makes a hell of a difference

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by euphorbioid View Post
    I am left handed and have been using Japanese knives for about 10 years. I can't honestly say I've ever had a problem with any gyuto I have used. Even ones advertised as 70/30 grind have been fine, no steering issues or other problems as far as I can tell. For a workhorse I have settled on a Gesshin Heiji from Jon Broida at JKI, but this is perhaps beyond your limit financially. Jon has other, less expensive knives and I would start with JKI. The Gesshin Ginga is reputed to be a thin blade but I have not tried these. To me the "handedness" of most double beveled knives is very exaggerated and, except in the case of extreme asymmetrical grinds, unimportant to the overall function of the knife. I'm not sure a gyuto with one convex side and one flat side really makes any sense or difference.

    Single bevel knives are a different story.

    Good luck in your search.
    Thanks

    I actually would not mind going over the budget of 300 still looking around, actually there's a few knives that I wanted to try to get into a few passarounds but it's all within CONUS so the only thing I could do is just go by reviews and seek advise from fellow members here.

    Quote Originally Posted by chinacats View Post
    Then please don't buy a Japanese blade--they are all asymmetric (though there may be an exception that I'm not aware of). If you can sharpen a symmetric blade then you can also sharpen asymmetric--just ask if you're not sure.

    And please save yourself the potential nightmare of buying a Moritaka.

    Cheers!
    I would love to ask and take a look but here where I am located, majority of the people are using symmetric blades and know nothing regarding asymmetric blades. The only thing I can do is watch videos (Jon's Videos) and ask advise from fellow forum members here. I am trying to get Dave's Sharpening DVD unfortunately he doesn't ship internationally.

    Quote Originally Posted by bkdc View Post
    The Takeda is 50/50 or can be easily made so if the bevel is slightly asymmetric. The blade is just a flat or slightly concave piece of steel, and there is no concern about asymmetry. But it's a pretty steep price for a 'starter' gyuto.
    Actually I am not looking for any starter gyuto, just want something that I like, actually I like the feel of the konosuke but am still looking around.

    Quote Originally Posted by stevenStefano View Post
    I have a custom lefty knife with approximately an 80/20 grind and it makes a hell of a difference
    May I ask which maker was it from and what difference does it make between a 80/20 grind compared to a 50/50 grind? For e.g. Food release, ease of cutting etc?

    Thanks KKF!

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by brianlsx View Post

    May I ask which maker was it from and what difference does it make between a 80/20 grind compared to a 50/50 grind? For e.g. Food release, ease of cutting etc?
    Sorry forgot to reply to this. It's a Tilman Leder 210 suji, quite a few people have one now, you can see a couple of pics here in my gallery. The asymmetry makes it cut way better, like cutting translucent slices of carrot, my gyutos don't come close to how fine I can get with this. It makes it steer a bit but it's definitely worth it. The food release is also fantastic, as you can see here


  5. #15
    Senior Member euphorbioid's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stevenStefano View Post
    The asymmetry makes it cut way better, like cutting translucent slices of carrot, my gyutos don't come close to how fine I can get with this. It makes it steer a bit but it's definitely worth it. The food release is also fantastic, as you can see here

    How do you know it is the asymmetry and not the grind or the thinness behind the edge that improves cutting ability? Short of a controlled experiment can you know?

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by chinacats View Post
    Then please don't buy a Japanese blade--they are all asymmetric (though there may be an exception that I'm not aware of). If you can sharpen a symmetric blade then you can also sharpen asymmetric--just ask if you're not sure.

    And please save yourself the potential nightmare of buying a Moritaka.

    Cheers!
    Man, I hope this isn't the kind of rude and crappy advise people have you when you started looking at knives.

    There are a few rough comments in this thread that really surprise me coming from this forum.

    To the OP, I'm a lefty and will say you don't need a knife ground for a lefty. I have owned all different kinds of knives some that are for a lefty, some ground for a righty, and some as close to 50/50 as you can get. Truthfully, it isn't going to kill you to have any of them. Some knives have great food release, some don't. If that is the only important thing to you look for a knife that is close to 50/50 with good food release. Honestly, I have owned over 50 gyutos and tried out a lot more. I don't think you need to worry to much about the grind being lefty or close to 50/50. I wouldn't recomend domethibg like an A-type but I can say I used a suji and 2 gyutos professionally for a while and it wasn't the end of the world, they still performed pretty well but there are easier/better knives to use for a lefty.

    -Chuck

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timthebeaver View Post
    I remember you extolling the virtues of Yusuke's convex grind before convex grinds were all the rage.
    -Convex grinds have always been all the rage and they always will. Most of us just didn't know it or call it that. All Japanese knives that I know of are ground with some element of convexity to them on at least one side of the blade and have been for a very long time.
    -I would say the "partial ground" knives are most lefty friendly, if you don't want to buy a true lefty ground blade. These include Heiji, Yoshikane, Kochi, Zakuri, Fujiwara Terayasu, etc. I also recommend Tilman. His custom knives are relatively affordable, perform very well and he happens to be a lefty and a kitchen knife junkie. I, myself, have several Tilman knives and one, in particular is going to the grave with me...along with a few others...

  8. #18
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    What do you like/not like about your current blades? If I were you, I'd just splurge on a Tanaka R2.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by euphorbioid View Post
    How do you know it is the asymmetry and not the grind or the thinness behind the edge that improves cutting ability? Short of a controlled experiment can you know?
    "The grind" is all of the characteristics you listed and more. Aside from the steel, the handle, the balance and the rounded edges, etc., the grind is thin or thick at the edge or at other places, symmetric or asymmetric, convex or concave or flat... So yes, it is "the grind" that makes it cut well and all aspects of it contribute to the cutting ability and yes, experiments (with reasonable controls) have been conducted. It's called trial and error and anyone who has done enough regrinding/thinning will know it.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuck239 View Post
    Man, I hope this isn't the kind of rude and crappy advise people have you when you started looking at knives.

    There are a few rough comments in this thread that really surprise me coming from this forum.

    -Chuck
    Didn't mean to sound rude, but from re-reading the post it sure sounds that way. Apologies to the OP and anybody else offended.

    Cheers!
    one man gathers what another man spills...

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