Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19

Thread: do you prefer aogami #1/#2 to aogami super in a pro kitchen?

  1. #1

    do you prefer aogami #1/#2 to aogami super in a pro kitchen?

    im wondering whether it would be better to go with a simple blue steel sujihiki or with one in aogami super. i think there are some reasons to prefer the former, ease of sharpening and the ability to rod beeing some of them.
    what do you think? can you recommend either?

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Wales, UK
    Posts
    910
    Smith more important than steel. ymmv

  3. #3
    that is one unsatisfying answer. what if its the same smith, assuming good heat treatment to 61 on blue and 64 on blue super.

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    712
    Personally if we are talking same smith I prefer..... It depends on the knife. For a sujihiki I would go with white over any blue (not trying to confuse things or derail the thread). I just don't see the benefit for the extra cost of blue in that scenario. In a pro environment between blue steels I would likely go with blue 2 due to the extra toughness. I can't see you getting that much more performance with AS for the extra $$$.

  5. #5
    I would suppose that you'd get better retention with the AS but it'd take you more time to sharpen in a rush. And then there's the smith-factor, as someone said. Also, not sure about this, but would you also want a bit of flex with a suji? If so, I'm not sure which steel would be better.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    4,214
    Edge retention is dependent on usage as much as steel characteristics. All things being equal, you'd expect AS to be more wear resistant but less stable than the other Hitachi steels we see here and at that hardness, it would be more brittle and prone to chipping. There's a reason why most knives are hardened to 61 ish. That's where someone with reasonable skill will get the most out of an edge. Harder and more alloy is likely going to get you less edge retention due to damage taken during wobbles, twists, and bumps over the course of use. If you want flexibility, don't use a clad blade.

  7. #7
    Senior Member K-Fed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Palm City, FL
    Posts
    765
    I don't particularly care much what steel the knife is made of, as long as it's a good one that's been treated well. The steel at the edge is much less important than the grind/ geometry of the knife and the heat treat of the steel can make the same steel, done by two different people perform completely differently. That being said, I prefer blue 1 or 2, to as as it's easier to quickly touch up on a finishing stone when needed making the full sharpening progression a once in a month or two occurrence depending on use.
    Don't touch my d!ck. Dont touch my knife. ~ Anthony Bourdain ~

  8. #8
    Senior Member Brad Gibson's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    832
    I find my aogami super takeda suji to be very easy to sharpen and it has an incredibly sharp edge. It surpasses any I've ever seen or used. My suji can clean shave an arm, which is the only body part I've tested, after doing a very busy service with high use and portioning fish. I think it's one of the best steels money can buy. I cannot say anything for the blue 1 or 2 as I have never tried a suji that had either of these steels. I just think the hype that says that aogami super is hard to maintain is bogus, at least in the blacksmith takedas knives.
    "A recipe has no soul. You as the cook must bring soul to the recipe." -Thomas Keller

  9. #9
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    dirty south, louisiana
    Posts
    2,363
    ive used 4 different knives with augami super. i loved the steel each time it was just everything else about those particular knives i found to be lacking somewhat. then again, im super picky about knives though, lol. Also, FWIW AS may be a tad more time consuming on the stones than other hitachi carbons but its still way quicker to sharpen than stainless. and unless you have reactivity problems on the edge, it should hold up pretty well, better than any other carbon steel that im aware of.

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    New York, NY
    Posts
    321
    i buy white, because it's cheap, gets sharp as hell and is incredibly easy to touch up, which will it will need often, very often

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •