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Thread: Why is this happening - sharpening ?

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by stereo.pete View Post
    10 degrees is crazy low if I understand you correctly.
    In my experience, most high end kitchen knife steels will produce a clean edge at 20 deg included angle. The issue is that edge may not hold during use for a variety of reasons.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by mkriggen View Post
    Another thought is what angle (about) are you sharpening at? If you're sharpening at a real shallow angle you may be creating an edge that is too thin for the steel to handle. Had this same problem on my white #2 paring knife (micro-bevel didn't help). I raised the angle on the primary bevel just slightly (a degree or so) and the problem went away. Hope this helps.

    Be well,
    Mikey
    It doesn't make sense that a microbevel didn't help but adding a degree to your included angle did. Can you elaborate on how you produced the edge that didn't take the micro?

  3. #23
    It could be that the martensite grain size in that area is not as small due to heat treating methods or it could of been overheated in that area causing the grain structure to grow.

  4. #24
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    the grand cheff line is ground 80/20, you should sharpen asymmetrically by the way. that knife doesnt have very good retention to begin with, youre better off not using a microbevel instead use frequent strop and ceramic honing rod.

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    It doesn't make sense that a microbevel didn't help but adding a degree to your included angle did. Can you elaborate on how you produced the edge that didn't take the micro?
    Only guessing here, but this is what I think happened. I originally sharpened the knife (Masakage Yuki 75mm petty) to about 10deg (20deg inc). This produced an edge that was too thin for the steel too handle and it actually started chipping while sharpening it. Adding a 20deg microbevel didn't help as the edge was still too thin to support it. When I backed off the primary angle a little bit the edge stabilized, stopped chipping, and took the microbevel just fine. Haven't had a problem since. Again, the analysis is my best guess, but the results are reality.
    Rule #1- Don't sweat the small s%&t, rule #2- It's ALL small s%&t
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  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by panda View Post
    the grand cheff line is ground 80/20, you should sharpen asymmetrically by the way. that knife doesnt have very good retention to begin with, youre better off not using a microbevel instead use frequent strop and ceramic honing rod.
    Interesting that you mention it. The page where I got the petty says that the grind is 50/50, when I received the knife the grin was about 80/20 as you are saying. I used it with uneven grind for some time, but I did not like it. I had to cut thing on slight angle, it was not too convincing for me. Now once I regrind it 50/50 - I like it much more.

    Again, thanks all for pitching in on the ideas and info.

  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by mkriggen View Post
    Only guessing here, but this is what I think happened. I originally sharpened the knife (Masakage Yuki 75mm petty) to about 10deg (20deg inc). This produced an edge that was too thin for the steel too handle and it actually started chipping while sharpening it. Adding a 20deg microbevel didn't help as the edge was still too thin to support it. When I backed off the primary angle a little bit the edge stabilized, stopped chipping, and took the microbevel just fine. Haven't had a problem since. Again, the analysis is my best guess, but the results are reality.
    FWIW, i've sharpened a masakage yuki at 10 degrees and less without trouble... my guess is that something is going on with your technique that is causing this. Hard to know exactly what without seeing you sharpen, but the knife is capable of being sharpened in that way (though it may not be the idea edge for it)

  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by JBroida View Post
    FWIW, i've sharpened a masakage yuki at 10 degrees and less without trouble... my guess is that something is going on with your technique that is causing this. Hard to know exactly what without seeing you sharpen, but the knife is capable of being sharpened in that way (though it may not be the idea edge for it)
    problem with my technique? No way!, I've been doing this for almost 6months, I'm sure I got it all figured out by now. Oh yeah, I'm sure my technique had a major effect, but backing off still worked for me until I get better at it
    Rule #1- Don't sweat the small s%&t, rule #2- It's ALL small s%&t
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  9. #29
    yeah... i wasnt trying to sound like a dick... just pointing out that it is possible to do that without chipping.

  10. #30
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    If it makes you feel better, I don't usually have any sharpening troubles, but I struggled with the one grand cheff gyuto that I sharpened. The problem I was having looked almost identical to yours and to be honest I don't know that I ever found a solution. Serious wire edge troubles. I'm thinking bum heat treat as the steel felt gummy on the stones. Didn't like it at all.
    Don't touch my d!ck. Dont touch my knife. ~ Anthony Bourdain ~

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