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Thread: Looking for recommendations on two gyutos and a 400-600 grit waterstone

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by mhlee View Post
    The OP is not an expert sharpener by his own admission. And, yet you're recommending that it's worthwhile for the OP to put time into thinning it and sharpening it?
    I'm more than willing to put in the work necessary to make this knife work though. I do think I would be better off trying to get the Carbonext and just selling the Artifex to someone I know who wouldn't know the difference or care enough. No matter what though, I'm expecting to put some work into my knives given that the Carbonext needs to be sharpened too, and I'm kind of looking forward to the practice.


    Quote Originally Posted by mhlee View Post
    I'm curious - to the OP - who recommended the Artifex to you?
    I've just heard good things about AEB-L steel, and I wanted to try it. I'm not super unhappy with it, but I just felt that I could be doing better. However, I do think that the Artifex has been improved upon compared to when it first came out. There are a few features on my knife that I got relatively recently that do not appear to be on the older Artifex knives that people on this forum. I need to play with this knife a bit more, but perhaps they've gotten the heat treatment better compared to when they first started.

    Quote Originally Posted by mhlee View Post
    For chef, I'd recommend the CarboNext. I have one. It works for rock chopping, is a more substantial knife than others, supposed to have good edge retention (I haven't used it enough to sharpen or test it), but it seems substantial enough to me. And, it's well within your budget.
    No, my chef is absolutely terrible about keeping his knife clean, and I do not think a carbon knife, even semi-stainless, will be good for him.


    To the OP - can you tell us what kind of performance characteristics you want in your next knife? Lack of wedging, smoothness of cutting, food release, etc.? You've identified a number of well regarded knives.
    I'm basically looking for all three things that you mentioned.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Flyingpigg View Post
    I'm more than willing to put in the work necessary to make this knife work though. I do think I would be better off trying to get the Carbonext and just selling the Artifex to someone I know who wouldn't know the difference or care enough. No matter what though, I'm expecting to put some work into my knives given that the Carbonext needs to be sharpened too, and I'm kind of looking forward to the practice.




    I've just heard good things about AEB-L steel, and I wanted to try it. I'm not super unhappy with it, but I just felt that I could be doing better. However, I do think that the Artifex has been improved upon compared to when it first came out. There are a few features on my knife that I got relatively recently that do not appear to be on the older Artifex knives that people on this forum. I need to play with this knife a bit more, but perhaps they've gotten the heat treatment better compared to when they first started.



    No, my chef is absolutely terrible about keeping his knife clean, and I do not think a carbon knife, even semi-stainless, will be good for him.




    I'm basically looking for all three things that you mentioned.
    First of all, there is a HUGE difference between sharpening, and regrinding the bevels. Despite what others say on other forums, I can tell you for certain that the CarboNext does not
    need the bevels to be reground. I got the regular version (not the extra sharp or whatever they call it) and it was fine. Could it used sharpening? Sure. But it was fine to use out of the box.

    Second of all, read through the forum about cutting performance and steel quality. Cutting performance, e.g., lack of wedging, smoothness of cutting, food release, has little to do with the steel quality; I'd go so far as to say it has very little to do with that. I've got very little experience with steel quality as I'm not a pro and I don't have to sharpen very often - I tend to sharpen more to practice and for sh*ts and giggles. But, what I've certainly experienced is that steel quality has a lot to do with edge retention, has a lot to do with sharpness as far as the edge itself is concerned, and rather a lot to do with ease of sharpening.

    On the other hand, cutting performance has to do with geometry and the grind of a knife. So, another reason why many of us here do not like that store's forum is because a lot of people over there go on and on about steel type and say little to nothing about actual knife performance. They'll do a quick video of chopping an onion fast, blah blah blah. Watch, listen and see the quality of cuts. Most of the quality of cutting on those videos is mediocre.

    On top of that, AEB-L on the Richmond, based on the reviews, is ABSOLUTELY NOT EVEN IN THE SAME GALAXY as AEB-L made by Devin Thomas. How the steel is treated makes the difference. See this thread as an example: http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/sh...-a-pro-kitchen

    I hate to say this, but you have been so brainwashed like I was when I started looking for knives. And if you really care about quality, you should look at the overall quality of a knife, not just one thing that people drone on and on about like steel type. Ask pointed questions.

    Next, if your chef leaves his knives in bowls of water, that's one thing. If he leaves them out with food on them for 30 minutes at a time, that's another. Which one is he?

    Lastly, thinner knives usually experience less wedging and smoother cutting. However, that oftentimes comes at the expense of food release. I don't think you're going to necessarily find one with the best of both worlds under $300. Above that price range, I can say that the Gengetsu has good food release, as did the Mario Ingoglia knife I had.

    My friends who have Heijis say they have good food release and are excellent cutters as well. But, they seem to be best suited for people who are, what I consider to be, advanced sharpeners. So, you can buy a more expensive knife, but if you can't sharpen it correctly, it may not necessarily be worth the extra $$$.

    But, in my opinion, I would say there is an extremely large difference in performance between the CarboNext and Gesshin Ginga. I consider the CarboNext to be a good entry level knife. The Gesshin Ginga is superior in nearly every performance characteristic when comparing them with no modification. The only thing I would like my Ginga to have would be better food release.

    I recommend that you read more reviews about knives first, then figure out exactly what you want, and then narrow your own choices down to a few. That way, members here who have personal experience with the few knives you're interested in will hopefully chime in.
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  3. #13
    Look at something like fujiwara or gesshin stainless for knives, nothing fancy but ground well doesn't need work and easy to sharpen.

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