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  1. #1
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    Pizza sauce/dough recipes?

    As the title states, does anyone have any good pizza sauce/dough recipes, now that it is getting nice out I'd like to try making some on the grill. Tried a test and I can get the heat on the grill up past 750ºF, should make for a nice crisp crust. If anyone is willing to share a recipe they like I'd appreciate, I plan on experimenting and if I find a good recipe I'll post up.

    Thanks
    Dan

  2. #2
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    This is the official government recipe, with the substitution of 2 kinds of flour in place of the sometimes hard to find 00 flour from Italy.

    Neapolitan Dough

    *1 1/2 cups warn water (105-115 degrees)
    *1 teaspoon dry yeast (that's right, 1 teaspoon!)

    3 cups all-purpose flour
    1 cup cake flour 1 T. sea salt

    *Combine water and yeast, proof for 5-8 minutes.
    Mix flours and salt in stand mixer with dough hook.
    Add yeast mixture to flour and knead at low speed for 30 minutes
    Shape dough into a round, place in lightly oiled bowl, turn to coat.
    *Cover bowl with plastic wrap and let rise for 4 hours in a warm spot. Punch down and divide into 2 or 4 pieces,
    shape into balls. Brush lightly with oil, cover with plastic wrap and let rise another 2-4 hours.
    *Shape by pressing fingertips into dough, leaving edge puffy to create a rim. Grasp rim with your hands,
    working your way around the circle. As the dough dangles it stretches while the edge stays plump.
    *Or you can roll it out with a rolling pin for a nice thin crust.*

    **
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  3. #3
    Mr. Hospitality! UnConundrum's Avatar
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    First off, remember that most pizza is comprised of simple recipes. That means that quality ingredients are very important. I assume you live near/in Philly. If you live North, Bova Foods, near Montgomeryville handles the 28 oz. cans of 6 in 1 tomatoes. They're the best for sauce. (well, 7/11 is a tie IMHO). If you're not close, you can buy direct from Escalon HERE. My recipe is simply tomatoes, salt, sugar, and basil. You can find the details HERE



    Now, dough is another thing. There are many, many recipes for many, many styles. I like a Neapolitan like Spike, but I use baker's math instead of a recipe.... more of a formula, and I make my dough by hand without kneading. The formula is 100% flour, 80% water, 2% salt and .3% yeast (or less). Once again, the flour you use is important. I use different flour depending on the temperature I'm baking at. 500-600F I use King Arthur High Gluten (you could substitute their bread flour that may be more available to you). 700-800 I use King Arthur All Purpose flour. Above 800, I use Caputo flour imported from Italy (You can buy that at Bova too).

    With the dough, procedure is as important as the ingredients and the recipe. A long slow fermentation is best, and even better yet is using a natural levain (sourdough). If using yeast, the longer you want to go in the fermentation the less yeast you use. The idea is to let the fermentation develop flavor in the dough. Letting a dough sit 24 - 48 hours is not unusual for those really into their pizza. I've done that several times, but rarely know I'll be in the mood for pizza that much in advance. If I want a same day dough, I'll follow the procedure I've set out in my baguette recipe recipe and a lot of step by step pictures here. Another recipe of mine with pictures of making the pizza on a BGE is HERE.





    Or, you could show up at the ECG and we'll make some pizzas together

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    About that time thing--When I make the above recipe I make a pizza with half of it and put the other half in the refrigerator to use the next day. The second day it is better!
    I'm lazy about sauce, I'll often use leftover spaghetti sauce!
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  5. #5
    Das HandleMeister apicius9's Avatar
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    Having eaten his pizza, I would say just do whatever Warren tells you.

    Stefan

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    Pizza has always been one of my favorite things to make, I've been doing it for nearly 20 years now.

    (in fact my avatar is me getting ready to toss a crust)

    I never have had a recipe for the dough, it's always just been what I was taught and memorized from my Mom.

    Recipe is per 1 pizza baked in a standard kitchen oven on a 12x20 baking sheet
    1 cup of tepid water
    1/2 tsp salt
    1 heaping tablespoon sugar
    1 tsp yeast
    proof the above until yeast bubbles
    add flour until the dough feels right.... (I've always likened it to a particularly fine booty, firm but not hard, very smooth skinned)

    roll/toss/etc to pizza shape desired
    I brush with olive oil and pre-cook the dough slightly at 350 for 10 minutes before topping. mostly because I could never manage to get the dough too cook thoroughly once sauced. and precooking a little give's me the crispness I wanted.

    probably heresy from a traditional standpoint but it's what I've always done.

  7. #7
    Senior Member wenus2's Avatar
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    Some pretty good advice so far.
    I've become a pretty hard core pizza guy over the past few years, trying to take full advantage of the brick oven.
    My love affair actually got started at a traditional pizza joint in Miami Beach and then blossomed at Kens Artisan Pizza in Portland, OR. I bet I ate there a couple of times a month for the couple of years I lived there.
    As was mentioned good pizza is all about the ingredients, and (generally) the more simple you keep your pizza, the better it will taste. The toughest lesson to learn was "less is more." If you pile on the toppings they just don't ring through like they otherwise would.
    The single greatest improvement to my pizza was when I made the move from King Arthur flour to Molino Caputo 00 flour (I'm baking at 8-900F).
    Use D.O.P. certified San Marzano tomatoes.
    Use fresh mozzarella - strain overnight on cheese cloth, over a bowl, covered.
    Use fresh basil - I prefer to add it to the pizza just as it comes out of the oven.

  8. #8
    Mr. Hospitality! UnConundrum's Avatar
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    You must mean like this one


  9. #9
    Senior Member spinblue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SpikeC View Post
    Mix flours and salt in stand mixer with dough hook.
    Add yeast mixture to flour and knead at low speed for 30 minutes
    Spike,
    Knead for 30 minutes, that seems like a really long time. I have no issue trying it but just wanted to make sure. Thx

  10. #10
    StephanFowler's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spinblue View Post
    Spike,
    Knead for 30 minutes, that seems like a really long time. I have no issue trying it but just wanted to make sure. Thx
    depends on how you want to build up the gluten in the dough, I usually kneed by hand for a good 15 minutes (I was taught the warmth from my hands was important)

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