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Thread: Gyuto under $200 for Newbie

  1. #21
    Senior Member rdpx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Benuser View Post
    Why do you tend to prefer the CN over the Misono Swedish - apart from price, reactivity and dragon?
    I actually love the reactivity on the Misono. It is currently all kinds of blues and purples from slicing a roast recently.

    I think it is probably more a gyuto over suji preference to be honest [use and also I find gyutos easier to charpen for some reason], although I do think the understated kanji on the CN looks nicer.

    $115 for a Carbonext is a steal.

  2. #22
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rdpx View Post
    I actually love the reactivity on the Misono. It is currently all kinds of blues and purples from slicing a roast recently.

    I think it is probably more a gyuto over suji preference to be honest [use and also I find gyutos easier to charpen for some reason], although I do think the understated kanji on the CN looks nicer.

    $115 for a Carbonext is a steal.
    sharpening a sujihiki, meant for roasts, is very simple. Almost no worry about geometry, have a sharp, relatively coarse edge, that's it, My gyuto gets a full progression, though.

  3. #23
    Senior Member rdpx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Benuser View Post
    sharpening a sujihiki, meant for roasts, is very simple. Almost no worry about geometry, have a sharp, relatively coarse edge, that's it, My gyuto gets a full progression, though.
    i just like making it like a razor


  4. #24
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rdpx View Post
    i just like making it like a razor

    good idea, just add a few very light final strokes with a 1k or so.

  5. #25
    Senior Member easy13's Avatar
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    Togiharu Inox 240 with a free initial sharpening and a King 1000/6000 combo stone from Korin

  6. #26
    Senior Member K-Fed's Avatar
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    I too like the fkm as a starter knife a lot. I've bought a few for co workers as gifts, but I would like to say that metal master has the 240mm tanaka ginsanko gyuto "on sale" ,its only 6% off but that puts it at 122 and change and it is a great knife as long as you don't mind so so handles. That would be what I would get knowing the quality of mr tanaka's treatment of the steel.
    Don't touch my d!ck. Dont touch my knife. ~ Anthony Bourdain ~

  7. #27
    Wow! In less than 24 hours y'all have astounded me with the amount of information you have given. Thank you so much!
    So from what I gather there are basically 2 main recommendations:

    Carbonext
    Pros: Easier to sharpen, holds edge well, amazing knife for the money
    Cons: Not sure if I like the look of Patina, may require sharpening OOTB, carbon which means being more aware of what the knife is laying on/in and for how long. I'm fine with it, but I'm not sure how my wife will do.

    Fujiwara FKM
    Pros: Only $85, Holds edge well, also great value for money, stainless
    Cons: Harder to sharpen, edge easier to chip?

    I'm leaning towards the Fujiwara atm, just to have a guaranteed decent starting edge. I may have to wait until Christmas to get my sharpening stones which also pushes me toward the Fujiwara for a half decent edge OOTB.

    Is the cutting performance of the Carbonext, Gesshin, and Tanaka Ginsanko worth the price difference over the Fujiwara? As a beginner at knife skills in the kitchen, would I even notice a difference between them?

  8. #28
    Senior Member K-Fed's Avatar
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    If you like the look and price of the fujiwara I'd say go for it. It is really hard to beat for the price sharpens up honestly quite easily as far as stainless goes. It isn't very chippy either, it isn't the hardest of steels but it does perform well and also responds well to light steeling on a very finely grooved steel or ceramic honing rod.
    Don't touch my d!ck. Dont touch my knife. ~ Anthony Bourdain ~

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by sparetire55 View Post
    Carbonext
    Pros: Easier to sharpen, holds edge well, amazing knife for the money
    Cons: Not sure if I like the look of Patina, may require sharpening OOTB, carbon which means being more aware of what the knife is laying on/in and for how long. I'm fine with it, but I'm not sure how my wife will do.
    Just so you understand that the Carbonext is semi-stainless, not "carbon" and is not as prone to rust the way a true carbon (ie <1% chromium blade) will be. It will patina however.

  10. #30
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    i wouldnt mind checking out a suisin inox western. if i was on the market for stainless western, thats what i would get. they just look good.

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