Quantcast
$500 budget for home cook gyuto - Page 2
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 38

Thread: $500 budget for home cook gyuto

  1. #11
    $500 Budget for the knife, good board and sharpening supplies is realistically good enough for good entry kit.
    Let's assume end-grain board - $100
    Sharpening Kit, basic combo stone - $60
    or
    Three stone set Coarse, 1K and 5K - $120 - I recommend this more
    So you already spent $220 + lets assume $50 shipping to Australia (Stones and board are heavy and the board is bulky as well)
    You've spent $270. You have $230 left for the knife.
    Realistically you are looking to $200-300 knife tops.

  2. #12
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Wales, UK
    Posts
    787
    Quote Originally Posted by Ruso View Post
    $500 Budget for the knife, good board and sharpening supplies is realistically good enough for good entry kit.
    Let's assume end-grain board - $100
    Sharpening Kit, basic combo stone - $60
    or
    Three stone set Coarse, 1K and 5K - $120 - I recommend this more
    So you already spent $220 + lets assume $50 shipping to Australia (Stones and board are heavy and the board is bulky as well)
    You've spent $270. You have $230 left for the knife.
    Realistically you are looking to $200-300 knife tops.
    Sorry, but a lot of this is nonsense.

    1. $500 gets you much better than "entry" kit.

    2. You really don't need a $100 cutting board.

    3. JCK for example ships worldwide for $7 (EMS, tracked, superfast). JNS shipping is FREE worldwide. Oddly enough, you don't have to buy from a US vendor.

    4. Spending $120 on stones is unnecessary. I agree on the combo stone.

  3. #13
    Yes, the money you're spending is far beyond "entry level." A lot of people put $100-$150 into their first J-knife.

    No, you don't need a $100 cutting board. I think a large end-grain is nice to have. You might want to decide if that should come out of the knife budget now. Or perhaps buy something more basic for now and upgrade later.

    Jon's Japanese Knife Imports youtube channel is very helpful for basic techniques: http://www.youtube.com/user/JKnifeIm...ature=mhsn#g/u Well worth a half hour or so to get an idea of the basics of knife sharpening, which is a small amount of time, in relation to the significant amount of money you're putting into your knife investment. You could get a basic combo stone and be well on your way to keep your new knife sharp.

  4. #14
    Personally, I recommend going with one medium grit stone that's not so abrasive that you'll really do a lot of damage to the edge, but abrasive enough to put a good, sharp edge, like the King 1200, or the Gesshin 2000, or similar stone; a stone flattener; a good synthetic board (whatever is available in Australia); and spend the rest on a ready to go out of the box knife.

    For beginners, I think the simpler the better. Using more than one stone is difficult, let alone using a three stone progression. With practice, you can get a really nice working edge with one stone. Using a stone flattener leads to predictable, consistent results.
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  5. #15
    Sorry, but a lot of this is nonsense.

    1. $500 gets you much better than "entry" kit.

    2. You really don't need a $100 cutting board.

    3. JCK for example ships worldwide for $7 (EMS, tracked, superfast). JNS shipping is FREE worldwide. Oddly enough, you don't have to buy from a US vendor.

    4. Spending $120 on stones is unnecessary. I agree on the combo stone.
    1. I said GOOD entry kit
    2. Well, when somebody is mentioning a cutting board as their purchase, I automatically assume we are talking about a good one. I mean, really who does not have a cutting board at home already? Or if you are planing to spend $20 on one, why do you even mention it.....
    3. The OP did not specify where he will buy the items, my shipping cost is a pure estimation from US/European seller. If you look close I had $100 variation on the knife price...
    4. Depends, I think buying three stones is better then a combo stone you will save on the long run. On another hand if the OP is not sure about whether he likes sharpening or not, a combo might be an option.

    I will keep my statement that if OP wants quality in all 3 aspects, he realistically can spend 200-300 dollars on a knives

    Personally, I recommend going with one medium grit stone that's not so abrasive that you'll really do a lot of damage to the edge, but abrasive enough to put a good, sharp edge, like the King 1200, or the Gesshin 2000, or similar stone; a stone flattener; a good synthetic board (whatever is available in Australia); and spend the rest on a ready to go out of the box knife.

    For beginners, I think the simpler the better. Using more than one stone is difficult, let alone using a three stone progression. With practice, you can get a really nice working edge with one stone. Using a stone flattener leads to predictable, consistent results.
    I can't comment on Gesshin 2000 rather than it's expensive I found King 1200 be rather slow, especially on cheap stainless knives (Knives you fool around with) and for the beginner it can be frustrated, well it was for me and still kinda is. Bester 1200 looks like a better alternative to King IMHO.

    I do not see any issue to start with 3 stones kit, except the money, especially if you have time and cheap knifes to fool around.

  6. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    697
    I knew this was gonna be good.

  7. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    1,136
    Quote Originally Posted by David88 View Post
    thanks for the reply's guys.
    I understand what you mean about buying an entry level knife first. I have a habit of buying the best quality I can afford but I guess the budget should be $500 for knife, sharpening, shipping and board.
    too bad because Im really liking the look and sound of the gesshin heiji. does anyone have any experience with the kochi migaki?

    Thank you everyone for your suggestions and feedback.
    If you really want some sort of Heiji and being in AU, I am suggesting to go direct as Heiji pricing and shipping is very reasonable for us in AU, even at 85 JPY a dollar right now. 26250JPY plus shipping and other fee should be under 350AUD. It is not the same as Gesshin Heiji though; for that Jon had it mad to his spec and quality control.

    For stone, best to get from Japan, for shipping and selection wise. Bestor 1200 and Arashiyama 6k will be a good start for wide bevel knife like Heiji.

    For a decent board, may be Peer Sorensen end gain board? 100 bucks for 50x35 and 20 for shipping AU wide.

  8. #18
    Heiji is a great knife, but if you are learning to sharpen you may want to start on something else. I may suggest a Kochi (I had the kurouchi V-2 as opposed to the migaki) which is a very nice knife for the money and much easier to sharpen. I believe one nice mid-grit stone and a finisher would be a nice start. Many good options for cutting board though I think you should get an end-grain board for sure if you plan on getting a nice knife. I definitely would suggest watching Jon's youtube channel here.

    Cheers
    one man gathers what another man spills...

  9. #19
    Senior Member ChuckTheButcher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Arlington Virginia
    Posts
    615
    $500 dollar budget leaves you a lot of options. You can get a shig kasumi for under 500. If you want to start a collection that's what I would probably go with. Just my thoughts though.
    All normal people love meat. If I went to a barbeque and there was no meat, I would say 'Yo Goober! Where's the meat?'.- Homer Simpson

  10. #20
    Senior Member Seb's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    498
    If you are in Oz and are on a budget then younshouldmbuybdirect from Japan through JCK or BWJ.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •