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Thread: Bashing Bones

  1. #1
    Senior Member smilesenpai's Avatar
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    Question Bashing Bones

    When segmenting a chicken (for example), do you use your gyuto? If so, what is the effects of bashing it through bones? Is a deba better off for the job?

  2. #2
    I rarely bash through the bones, but when I did, I used a nice and heavy CCK cleaver. I do not see a gyuto bashing through the bones to be honest you will chip the blade.
    To segment a chicken you do not need to bash through the bones, just cut where the joints are. You can use Honesuki/boning knife to do it or even a petty will do.
    You can see an example here:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JQT1ol6Psug

    Deba is more of a fish knife AFAIK.

  3. #3
    Senior Member Chuckles's Avatar
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    I use my misono dragon gyuto on chicken bones regularly and it has never chipped. A western deba would be great for this use. A traditional single beveled deba would not be a good choice for chix bones.
    'The only real security that a man can have in this world is a reserve of knowledge, experience, and ability.' -Henry Ford

  4. #4
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    i used to break down a case of ducks every week. by break down, i mean everything because this was for sausage. i used a gesshin ginga 150 petty, which if you've handled one, you know weighs literally about 30 grams, its quite a thin piece of steel. i never once had to go through bones and never chipped the blade and could do this job faster than any of my station partners.
    i don't think a deba is necessarily unsuited for poultry, because it is ultimately a lot sturdier than a honesuki, but it's the profile that' the issue, it is uneccesarily tall for that job which will be less efficient and likely produce lesser results.
    in my opinion, unless the cuisine demands it, there's simply no need to go through bones on poultry. try using the most delicate knife you have and it will make you very conscious of how you work.
    fwiw, i have never used a gyuto for poultry fabrication, too awkward is all

  5. #5
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheDispossessed View Post
    i used to break down a case of ducks every week. by break down, i mean everything because this was for sausage. i used a gesshin ginga 150 petty, which if you've handled one, you know weighs literally about 30 grams, its quite a thin piece of steel. i never once had to go through bones and never chipped the blade and could do this job faster than any of my station partners.
    i don't think a deba is necessarily unsuited for poultry, because it is ultimately a lot sturdier than a honesuki, but it's the profile that' the issue, it is uneccesarily tall for that job which will be less efficient and likely produce lesser results.
    in my opinion, unless the cuisine demands it, there's simply no need to go through bones on poultry. try using the most delicate knife you have and it will make you very conscious of how you work.
    fwiw, i have never used a gyuto for poultry fabrication, too awkward is all
    I have the Kono version of that knife that Jon sold before he started the Ginga line. Haven't handled the Ginga, but I'm guessing they're pretty similar. I used my Konosuke almost exclusively for a wide variety of meat fab, and it did/does perform beautifully. A little finesse goes a long way, and saves you a lot of product.
    The AI does not love you, nor does it hate you, but you are made out of atoms it might find useful for something else. - Eliezer Yudkowsky

  6. #6
    i use a dp honesuki. works good.

  7. #7
    IMHO....sticking with your example A Gyuto is fine, a deba or western deba is overkill.
    Usually, there is only one bone structure you'd go thru - the wish bone & breastbone. No reason you can't just slice thru that. Alternatively, sharpen the back 20% (?) for your blade at a more obtuse angle to accommodate the slightly heavier tasks. Finally, and this comes from a video showing a bunch of Japanese culinary students observing in a poultry processing store....flip the blade over and give the bone a solid whack with the spine. In this video, even though they were using a garasuki or honosuki, the demonstrator flipped the blade over, and he did the move very quickly.

  8. #8
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    also, though some might think it's a hack move, a good pair of joyce chens will help with chicken bones, you can get em for $20 on amazon, they are absolutely the best kitchen scissors for the money.

  9. #9
    My favorite chicken cutting knife is a double bevel ground wa handled Carter Deba style knife slightly under 6-inches in blade length. (I don't know how many "suns" that is) There is more than one way to cut up a poultry fryer but mine involves 4 bone cuts. Spit the breast down the middle from the inside and then cut each half into two more pieces. Cut the back into two pieces. The Carter works perfect for this system. Never any edge damage.

  10. #10
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    utility/petty (i use a flexible wusthof one that's been heavily thinned), but why are you going through bone???

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