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Thread: wich knife should i buy?

  1. #1

    Join Date
    Feb 2017
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    wich knife should i buy?

    Good morning, i am studying cooking and iwould like to ask you about knives.
    Before approximately 15 years, I had bought a suitcase with knives of wusthof,the classical series (about 12 knives and various accessories).
    For many years it was closed and unused, except for the knife of chef, who use it in my kitchen.
    Now i decide to deal with cooking, I opened my suitcase. All knives were in very good condition, apart from the knife chef.
    My teacher chef said that is very well knives, but the knife chef is quite damaged. He tried many times to sharpen with the chew and after with the ladakono (grindstone from Elounda Crete).
    She made a little, and told me to do it almost every day.
    My question is, because I dont know anything about knives, i want for start to buy a santuko knife, ( 80 euros) and later to buy a good knife chef.
    I have so much confused with Japanese knives shantung, and I do not know from what company I get.
    I hope to help me, thank you very much.

    location

    Greece
    KNIFE TYPE
    Santuko,youto
    right handed
    japanese handle
    80 euros
    KNIFE USE
    professional environment (new starter)
    slicing vegetables, chopping vegetables, mincing vegetables, slicing meats, cutting down poultry, breaking poultry bones, filleting fish, trimming meats
    With knife I'll get sharpening stones and take care knife myself.
    nicely finished (handle and blade)
    18-20 cm

  2. #2
    Senior Member
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    If reactive is OK, consider an Eden Kanso, a Hiroshi Kato or a Katsushige Anryu (not his Masakage lines, they are more expensive). Check if your local health codes allow japanese handles in a pro kitchen, in some areas they do not like wood in such an environment.

  3. #3

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    Thanks for your suggestions

  4. #4
    Senior Member
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    How you cut is important for the choice... If you do a lot of rock-chopping I think you might be better off with a gyuto (because of the extra length). If you do mostly chopping and push-cuts a santoku might be just fine.

    The 2nd big question is whether you want to go with a stainless or carbon blade. In an oversimplified nutshell stainless is a lot easier in maintenance (no wiping blades, can't rust, no reactivity), but carbon is a lot easier to sharpen.

  5. #5
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    ...and to keep sharp - I know some other forumites experiences differ, but I'm always amazed how often low alloy carbons (Shirogami) can be stropped back to shaving on an unloaded surface (paper or softwood) before needing actual sharpening.

    BTW, are you yourself adept at using the greek natural stone you mentioned? If yes, write something up about it, this place is full of natural stone fans...

  6. #6
    Senior Member
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    Metal Master in Japan has a western red handled Tanaka 190 damascus VG10 gyuto for 70$ plus 8$ for shipment cost. Lovely little thing and IMO best knife you can get for that price. It's a stainless steel gyuto/chefs knife and it will be more versatile than a santoku.

    I've had it in 240 size, I still have one in 150 size petty and that very same 190 gyuto I bought a few weeks ago and I'll be getting it tomorrow.

    FYI If you buy from Metal Master he is slow to ship the products and also very inactive to respond to emails, but the products will come eventually in a few weeks.

  7. #7

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    Feb 2017
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    good morning. Τhe ladakono is a natural stone from Elounda of Crete. Use only with oil, some recommend you to dive into oliveoil for 1 day. The more you use the stone, the better results it has. Most chefs in Crete, and Greece, use that stone for sharpening. In this link you can see some fotos.http://www.cretanknives.gr/product.a...&cat=0&lang=el.
    Java, thanks for the proposal. Looking at it seriously and probably will order it. Thanks

  8. #8
    Senior Member
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    I'd recommend to consider Dictum in Germany (they have Tanaka and other brands for decent prices - not as cheap as MM, but known reliable!) while you're still in the EU Also, Schmidt Feine Werkzeuge, they have, for example, Anryu carbons for good prices.

    "some recommend you to dive into oliveoil for 1 day"

    That is dedication to the art of sharpening I think the term you were looking for is "soak" (you told us to take a bath in olive oil......) - but doesn't the olive oil get rancid in the stone?

  9. #9

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    while you're still in the EU [/QUOTE]
    yes, we are still in the European Union. When Germany pay us the war reparations, then maybe we think to leave EU.
    I think the difference between countries was the policy and not in humans, I regret that I see the opposite.
    Hereis not a political forum. Please, jokes for my country are not permitted.

  10. #10
    Matus's Avatar
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    Newchef, dictum is a good place to look around and they are a reliable company - I have bought from them several items over the past few years.

    Please do not get too upset - that comment of LifeByA1000Cuts did not mean no harm. Everyone who follows the news knows that the situation in Greece is no fun. I sincerely hope you guys will pull through the tough times (whatever the reason for the situation is).

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