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Thread: applying urushi on natural stones

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Asteger View Post
    That's too bad if you have a lot of US customers, as I said you might consider selling some yourself. However, maybe you still can? Just display a note with the urushi that this product cannot be shipped to the US.
    Hyper Cafe has urushi, but I'd go with Cashew lacquer. Urushi is known to cause severe allergic reactions after a few uses, while cashew does not and works just as well. All my Jnats are cashew lacquered, and from what I have seen in Japan this is widely used. Urushi needs certain temperature and humidity conditions to dry correctly (and it takes a few days), or at least that is what the instructions I have seen stated.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chef Niloc View Post
    As for the question about going over old lacquer. I don't know why you would want to do this? Is the old lacquer chipped, or are you just wanting to redo it in a more traditional way?
    Thanks for your suggestions, Chef N - yeah, I was thinking I'd have to take sandpaper to it as well as perhaps try and dissolve it a bit somehow. Why? I just like the look of urushi or some kind of solid lacquer on stones. It also appears to offer more support to the stones over the years (can have a thicker, softer appearance). I've also got a couple of stones I've bought that, while very good (and pricey), haven't been finished well with lacquer (swarf stains on the sides) and so I figure they'd look a lot better to me after some treatment. And overall, I just think it'd be cool to try.

    Thanks Mainaman - I haven't been too worried about allergic reactions, but I'll also consider the cashew. From what I can tell it looks the same when finished, while the urushi smells nicer ... or at least not like lacquer.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Asteger View Post

    Thanks Mainaman - I haven't been too worried about allergic reactions, but I'll also consider the cashew. From what I can tell it looks the same when finished, while the urushi smells nicer ... or at least not like lacquer.
    They are SEVERE allergic reactions, like Poison Ivy type of allergic reactions, consider that for a moment. Cashew is the best in my book, the cans you get from hyper cafe, are enough for many stones, if you thin the content.

  4. #14
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    SEVERE allergic reactions? Hehe, don't mean to be facetious but it's almost sounding cooler in my book. "Hey, don't touch my stones! Want a deadly rash?"

    But really I wonder why urushi would have been used for generations if it is so toxic. Seems it is generally so mostly when it hasn't dried. Guess I'll find out.

    (Incidentally, I'm immune to poison ivy and apparently there is a connection.)

    In the mean time, yes, I'll be looking into cashew too.

  5. #15
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    I read that cashew can be as poisons as urushi :P Thats why it is on restriction list too

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    Quote Originally Posted by maxim View Post
    I read that cashew can be as poisons as urushi :P Thats why it is on restriction list too
    That's because Cashew shell contains Urushiol as well, but in less quantities then "Chinese lacquer tree" and it can be air cured so it's supposed to be safer....

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Asteger View Post
    SEVERE allergic reactions? Hehe, don't mean to be facetious but it's almost sounding cooler in my book. "Hey, don't touch my stones! Want a deadly rash?"

    But really I wonder why urushi would have been used for generations if it is so toxic. Seems it is generally so mostly when it hasn't dried. Guess I'll find out.

    (Incidentally, I'm immune to poison ivy and apparently there is a connection.)

    In the mean time, yes, I'll be looking into cashew too.
    It is only bad when you apply, after it is dry it is no longer causing problems.
    My guess as to why it was used for generations is that it was the only thing available that was good enough to do the job. Cashew is fairly new stuff that is chemically derived from urushi (I believe) that has no adverse effects.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by maxim View Post
    I read that cashew can be as poisons as urushi :P Thats why it is on restriction list too
    Max,
    I think it is restricted because it has flammable solvents in it, other than that it is harmless, I have had it on my hands many times while sealing stones.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by mainaman View Post
    Hyper Cafe has urushi,.
    Can you still find there web sight? I think they went out of Business?

    Quote Originally Posted by maxim View Post
    I read that cashew can be as poisons as urushi :P Thats why it is on restriction list too
    How about "flake white" paint, that's still easy to get and lead based paint are pretty toxic

    two stage urethane paints will give you bigger problems then poison ivy

    There are more "art Supplies" then you can think of that can kill you, don't drink turpentine!

    As to why urushi was/is still being used. Remember it's primary use is not to protect polishing stones it's used in a highly Specialized art form. An important component of the Japanese art of lacquerwork is the special technique known as "urushi", which uses many layers of wafer-thin, semi-transparent lacquer to create a surface of almost mystical radiance and depth. Many different things have been invented/ used to try and recreate the look and effect of Japanese lacquer work, including cashew, japanning, and even modern day urethane "candy coat" pants, when they paint a car that say they are " spraying lacquer" but in all Actuality it's urethane.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chef Niloc View Post
    Can you still find there web sight? I think they went out of Business?
    they were hard to find at some point, may be they were not operational for a while???
    Here is the link
    http://www.hyper-cafe.com/index.php?l=product_list&c=11

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