Quantcast
Knife sharpening issues for a newbie - Page 2
Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 44

Thread: Knife sharpening issues for a newbie

  1. #11
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Portland, Maine
    Posts
    1,997
    The 220 sounds like your best bet. Just take it slow, and check your work often, as it will remove material pretty quick.
    The AI does not love you, nor does it hate you, but you are made out of atoms it might find useful for something else. - Eliezer Yudkowsky

  2. #12
    Senior Member zitangy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    SIngapore
    Posts
    497
    1. I wld remove the chips /nicks on a say 200 grit either sandpaper or stone by using an angle of abt 60 degrees with only long strokes so as not to compromise the shape/ profile of the knife. Sort of scraping motion ( spine leading on both sides) Follow the shape of the edge Take note that towards the heel, the blade is thicker and may need more work than the front portion. At all times be aware that you need to maintain the integrity of the profile.

    Check constantly how much steel and where you are removing!

    2. AS the edge wld have receded guite a fair bit on the shun, you may need to then thin the egde as it wld have become slightly thicker by using a lower angle and put a slightly higher angle later. I prefer to do this on a slightly higher grit say 400grit as pnce you remove metal you cant put it back.

    It shld still be able to cut paper if the 2 angles have met and thin enough.. but rough.

    3.Once it is thin enough use the combo stone.

    Have fun..

    rgds
    d

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by ar11 View Post
    Shun Santoku - If you can see in the photo the edge is TORN! If i shot the edge from straight above, the tear is not in alignment with the rest of the edge and drags ferociously on the stones. How do i remedy this issue? I was thinking about trying to bend it back somehow but either way looks like that piece of metal has been compromised. This will be the last Shun I own. their VG10 is crap, chips so easily.
    Those aren't "chips" or a "torn" edge. That's bad use. I think this has very little to do with the steel, and mostly to do with whoever used that knife.

    I think it's very presumptuous to blame the steel and say that the VG10 is crap and "chips so easily." In fact, if that steel was chippy, instead of bends in the edge, you should have HUGE chips.

    But, that edge is chipped AND bent. Normal, correct use would not generally cause that kind of damage, e.g., cutting forward and back, vertically, not forcing the edge through something too hard, etc. There's no reason for the edge of a knife to be that bent if correct technique were used.

    Based on those two things, I think the knife was either used for something frozen or hard, causing the actual chipping, but also pushed with significant force onto something hard when it was used, or used in a striking motion at an angle, or it got stuck and was twisted (toward the left?) when it was pulled out. It looks like a Dexter stainless Chinese Cleaver I saw recently that had similar damage.

    While I've never owned a Shun, I've seen several Shuns that have had carbide fallout. That doesn't look like carbide fallout as explained to me by Jon Broida.

    That's also not a simple fix from what I understand. You can't bend the edge back straight, so you'll likely have to either (1) grind away that entire portion that was damaged and re-profile the knife (I've done this on my own knife), and then recreate the edge or (2) sharpen both sides and hope until that portion is ground down. You're better off sending that knife to a pro unless you have a grinder and want to spend some time on it.
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  4. #14

    Zwiefel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Little Rock, AR
    Posts
    2,259
    Might use a cinder block to knock out the bulk of the work, then do the thinning + bevel reset with your expensive stones. I did a more extreme repair this way a while back:

    http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/sh...ghlight=cinder
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

  5. #15
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Cincinnati, Oh
    Posts
    3,487
    I've seen knives used on frozen food that looked just like that Shun.

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by mhlee View Post
    Those aren't "chips" or a "torn" edge. That's bad use. I think this has very little to do with the steel, and mostly to do with whoever used that knife.

    I think it's very presumptuous to blame the steel and say that the VG10 is crap and "chips so easily." In fact, if that steel was chippy, instead of bends in the edge, you should have HUGE chips.
    I blame my wife for the damages! She's an excellent cook but could care less about kitchen tools. She thinks im an idiot because im buying all these fancy japanese knives. But I'll change her mind .. one day. So I respect that point about the tear or whatever it is, I supposed the whole thing would've chipped away if it were too brittle. But on the other hand this Shun, my mom's Shun, my sister's Shun have all developed small chips doing easy cutting on just vegetables and soft meats. That bugs the crap out of me, hate that think what I'm eating has small flecks of metal.

    The Tanaka I sharpened out the small chips this morning in about 45min with the 1k stone. Watched Jon's vids and used the sharpie trick. It's probably nowhere are good as most members here, but as my first full sharpening job felt quite proud of myself. I'll post some photos when I get home. I'm going to give that Shun no mercy. Take it to some rough sandpaper or the fixer brick and beat it up some. It's seen several years of use already so wont feel too bad about making it a project

  7. #17
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Cincinnati, Oh
    Posts
    3,487
    I have owned and used many Shuns, and I've never gotten chips on them. "easy cutting" for most people is hammering the damn thing into the board and throwing it into the sink.

    If you don't think that Shun, it's going to cut like crap, just FYI. If the finish matters to you, Shun's etch well.

  8. #18
    Senior Member Mrmnms's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
    970
    Maybe listen to your wife. Give her something that will take abuse that suits her. You'll save a lt of money and aggravation .There are plenty of great cooks who don't share our enthusiasm for crazy knives. My wife would never use one of my good knives. No desire at all, but I keep her cheap knives as sharp as she likes them.
    Quote Originally Posted by ar11 View Post
    I blame my wife for the damages! She's an excellent cook but could care less about kitchen tools. She thinks im an idiot because im buying all these fancy japanese knives. But I'll change her mind .. one day. So I respect that point about the tear or whatever it is, I supposed the whole thing would've chipped away if it were too brittle. But on the other hand this Shun, my mom's Shun, my sister's Shun have all developed small chips doing easy cutting on just vegetables and soft meats. That bugs the crap out of me, hate that think what I'm eating has small flecks of metal.

    The Tanaka I sharpened out the small chips this morning in about 45min with the 1k stone. Watched Jon's vids and used the sharpie trick. It's probably nowhere are good as most members here, but as my first full sharpening job felt quite proud of myself. I'll post some photos when I get home. I'm going to give that Shun no mercy. Take it to some rough sandpaper or the fixer brick and beat it up some. It's seen several years of use already so wont feel too bad about making it a project

  9. #19
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Cincinnati, Oh
    Posts
    3,487
    that should have been "don't think that Shun," not don't think it. But you should think about thinning it before you thin it.

  10. #20
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Portland, Maine
    Posts
    1,997
    Quote Originally Posted by Mrmnms View Post
    Maybe listen to your wife. Give her something that will take abuse that suits her. You'll save a lt of money and aggravation .There are plenty of great cooks who don't share our enthusiasm for crazy knives. My wife would never use one of my good knives. No desire at all, but I keep her cheap knives as sharp as she likes them.
    Sage advice.
    The AI does not love you, nor does it hate you, but you are made out of atoms it might find useful for something else. - Eliezer Yudkowsky

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •