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Thread: Hyper-decanting - Anyone try it?

  1. #21
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyChance View Post
    Probably not Wild Turkey. But I was thinking about trying it with a wheated bourbon, which often benefit from some air. Maker's Mark, Larceny, Old Weller Antique, Weller 12 year old, Jefferson's Presidential Select, any of the Pappy Van Winkles, William Larue Weller, some of the Vintage and older Michter's releases, etc. Probably should try it with some OWA or W12 first though, just cost wise. A common practice for Weller 12 is to save the empty bottle of the one you just finished and when you get a new one, put half of it in the empty bottle. Then let them sit for weeks or months or whatever and let them oxidize or oxygenates or whatever it is that happens to them. Then consume.
    Woah... First I've heard of oxygenating high spirits in this manner. Very intriguing...
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  2. #22
    I have not heard of it either, but when I read this thread today I thought of wheated bourbons. Like I said, I will try it with something cheap like Makers, OWA or Larceny before moving on to the expensive stuff.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  3. #23
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyChance View Post
    I have not heard of it either, but when I read this thread today I thought of wheated bourbons. Like I said, I will try it with something cheap like Makers, OWA or Larceny before moving on to the expensive stuff.
    It makes sense, I always throw a small splash in my single malts. Literally a splash. Brings forth the back notes, and tones down the fiery frontness, that tends to overwhelm the full palate experience.
    The AI does not love you, nor does it hate you, but you are made out of atoms it might find useful for something else. - Eliezer Yudkowsky

  4. #24
    Das HandleMeister apicius9's Avatar
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    So, should I bring my 1975 Arbeg with a splash of water to drinking temperature in a Vitamix? Not that I have a Vitamix, and I might have to sell the Ardbeg to afford one...

    Stefan

  5. #25
    Oxygen saturation in water will occur somewhere between 6 and 8 parts per million (this number depends upon temperature, salinity and elevation). This means that the water molecules have absorbed as much oxygen as they can easily hold under the present conditions. Any oxygen added beyond this point will be released back into the atmosphere with the least amount of disturbance in the water. Thus I doubt that putting wine in a blender adds more oxygen than a usual aerator. It will however, oxidize the wine and potentially heat it up. Unless there are specific molecules in the wine that have an affinity for oxygen, like hemoglobin in our blood, any oxygen added above the saturation point will just bubble up.

  6. #26
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
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    Correct me if I'm wrong, but the whole point is to oxidize the wine(after a certain point the oxidation starts to produce a negative result obviously), which is why a flat bottom decanter is typically seen as the preferred method for decanting. If you put said wine into a blender you're effectively folding the wine at high speeds and exposing a greater amount of the wine molecules to oxygen at an accelerated rate...?
    The AI does not love you, nor does it hate you, but you are made out of atoms it might find useful for something else. - Eliezer Yudkowsky

  7. #27
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric View Post
    Oxygen saturation in water will occur somewhere between 6 and 8 parts per million (this number depends upon temperature, salinity and elevation). This means that the water molecules have absorbed as much oxygen as they can easily hold under the present conditions. Any oxygen added beyond this point will be released back into the atmosphere with the least amount of disturbance in the water. Thus I doubt that putting wine in a blender adds more oxygen than a usual aerator. It will however, oxidize the wine and potentially heat it up. Unless there are specific molecules in the wine that have an affinity for oxygen, like hemoglobin in our blood, any oxygen added above the saturation point will just bubble up.
    polyphenoloxidase. that is just one compound. fermentation products are very complex.

  8. #28
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Eric View Post
    Whatever! Instead of needless rude childish comments, perhaps you could try simply being ok that someone has a different opinion.

    FYI. I graduated with distinction from an Ivy League College and majored in molecular biology followed by a top medical school.
    yet you don't understand mechanical aeration. oxygen absorption by the medium is simply one aspect of aerating wine. as oxygen slowly bubbles out of suspension, compounds are liberated from the fluid, which is probably why my double-blind wine aeration experiments have shown that the greatest difference is on the nose.

    I used to work for Jerry Lingrel and Peter Stambrook, for what it's worth.

  9. #29
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brainsausage View Post
    If you put said wine into a blender you're effectively folding the wine at high speeds and exposing a greater amount of the wine molecules to oxygen at an accelerated rate...?
    of course, which is why you can make mayo in a blender quite quickly, once the initial emulsion is set.

  10. #30
    Senior Member Lucretia's Avatar
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    There comes a point in the life of every process where it becomes necessary to shoot the engineers and begin production.

    Try it and drink whatever you like. Sheesh.
    Now is not the time to bother me. And it's always now. Wiley Miller

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